Texas

The current state poet laureate of Texas is Jenny Browne, who was appointed in 2017 and is serving a one-year term. Browne is the author of three poetry collections, most recently Dear Stranger (University of Tampa Press, 2013). She received the Cecil Hemley Award from the Poetry Society of America, as well as several fellowships from the National Endowment of Arts and the San Antonio Artist Foundation. Browne currently teaches creative writing, environmental literature, and women and gender studies at Trinity University in San Antonio.

upcoming events

datesort ascending
Mar 23 2018
Martín Espada

Martín Espada has published nearly twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His latest collection of poems is Vivas to Those Who Have Failed (2016). Other books of poems include The Trouble Ball (2011), The Republic of Poetry (2006), Alabanza (2003), and A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (2000). His honors include the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, an American Book Award, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. The Republic of Poetry was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A former tenant lawyer in Greater Boston’s Latino community, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

7:30pm
508 Center Street
78640 Kyle, Texas
Nov 17 2017
Gabrielle Calvocoressi

Gabrielle Calvocoressi’s first book, The Last Time I Saw Amelia Earhart, was shortlisted for the Northern California Book Award and won the 2006 Connecticut Book Award in Poetry. Her second collection, Apocalyptic Swing, was a finalist for the 2009 Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Her awards and honors include a Stegner Fellowship, a Jones Lectureship at Stanford University, and a Rona Jaffe Women Writers’ Award. Her poem “Circus Fire, 1944” received The Paris Review’s Bernard F. Connors Prize. She teaches at the MFA programs at California College of Arts in San Francisco and at Warren Wilson College. She also runs the sports desk for the Best American Poetry Blog.

7:30pm
508 Center Street
78640 Kyle, Texas
Oct 12 2017 to Oct 14 2017
Texas Grand Slam Poetry Festival
The Texas Grand Slam Poetry Festival is a 3 day poetry feast featuring 42 poets with the gumption to compete for the Title: Texas Grand Slam Poetry Champion and a $1500 Grand Prize. 
 
TGS is the answer to those who are hungry, clutching at a Sunday morning back row pew of worry with prayers for poetry. We hope that the drought for a state-wide poetry slam has come to an end. We invite everyone to return and are proud to present to you the 7th Annual TEXAS GRAND SLAM POETRY FESTIVAL!
 
Texas Grand Slam is back for 2017, starting with the last chance slam on October 12th, prelims and semis on October 13th, and final stage on October 14th.
 
Tickets here

More info here

7:00pm
210 W 26th St
77803 Bryan, Texas

recent & featured listings

typesort ascending name state
Colony Dobie Paisano Fellowship Program Texas
Writing Program Texas State University Texas
Writing Program Texas A&M University Texas
Writing Program Texas Tech University Texas
Writing Program University of Houston Texas
Writing Program University of Texas Michener Center Texas
Writing Program Sam Houston State University Texas
Writing Program Southern Methodist University Texas
Small Press Chax Press Texas
Small Press Mutabilis Press Texas

poems

poem
Jim

You looked Texas today
road hard, scrubbed brush, blown tires
gasoline islands

But later California returned—fortune’s poster child
radiating. Truck full of gas,
cheap camera in the glove compartment
stuffed toys on the dashboard,
beads on the steering wheel,
a pretty girl’s

poem

Old fang-in-the-boot trick. Five-chambered
asp. Pit organ and puff adder. Can live
in any medium save ice. Charmed by the flute
or the first thunderstorm in spring, drowsy
heart stirs from the cistern, the hibernaculum,
the wintering den of stars. Smells like the cucumber
served

poem
see my brother-in-law with a styled shirt

in spite of his cancer below 

then a small dinner in the evening the next day

no one knows except I may be on the road

Mesquite where my father settled in '31

forty-five minutes west then a left you go in

sister Sarita waits for me on Abby Street

after decades in