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Oct 08 2015 to Oct 10 2015

Poets Forum

This year’s Poets Forum will be held October 8 to 10, 2015, and will feature readings and conversations by the award-winning poets who serve on our organization’s Board of Chancellors. Purchase tickets at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/poets-forum-2015-october-8-10-tickets-17880472976


A Reading by the Academy of American Poets Chancellors
6:30–8:00 p.m.
Location: The Skirball Center for the Performing Arts, New York University, 566 LaGuardia Place

Join us for an unforgettable evening as award-winning poets from across the U.S. who serve as Chancellors of the Academy of American Poets come together on one stage to share their poems. Featuring Elizabeth Alexander, Toi Derricotte, Mark Doty, Linda Gregerson, Juan Felipe Herrera, Jane Hirshfield, Khaled Mattawa, Marilyn Nelson, Naomi Shihab Nye, Alicia Ostriker, Claudia Rankine, Alberto Ríos, Arthur Sze, Anne Waldman, and C. D. Wright. The reading will be followed by a book signing in the lobby.


Poetry Walking Tours of Brooklyn (For all-events passholders only)
10:30 a.m.–noon (led by Brooklyn Poet Laureate Tina Chang)
& 1:30–3:00 p.m. (led by poet Lynn Melnick)

Passholders may RSVP to take a walking tour exploring the literary history of Brooklyn, with stops at the Cave Canem Foundation and Berl’s Poetry Shop—the only all-poetry bookstore in NYC. More details in early fall.

A Reading by Marie Howe and Lecture by Joy Harjo
6:30–7:30 p.m.
Location: Theresa Lang Center, The New School, 55 West 13th Street, 2nd Floor

Join us for a reading by recent New York State Poet Laureate Marie Howe and a lecture on contemporary poetry by Joy Harjo: “Ancestors: a Mapping of Indigenous Poetry and Poets.” In this, our annual Blaney Lecture, Harjo will give an overview of the current field of young indigenous poets, and their ancestral strands of relatives. The branches extend throughout the world, before the English language.The annual Blaney Lecture was created in memory of former Academy of American Poets Board member Dorothy Gulbenkian Blaney by a gift from her estate. The event will be followed by a book signing and reception.


Chancellor Conversations
10:00 a.m.–3:50 p.m.
Location: Theresa Lang Center, The New School, 55 West 13th Street, 2nd Floor

A series of five dynamic conversations between the diverse poets who serve on our honorary Board of Chancellors on topics central to poets and readers today.

In Search of Poetry Today: Toi Derricotte, Anne Waldman, and C. D. Wright
10:00–10:50 a.m.
The dissolution of genres. Poetry as drawing. The City of Poetry. The Country of Poetry. The Bomb Shelter of Poetry. The Tenant Farm of Poetry. The Exclusion Zone of Poetry. Poets Anonymous. Poetry’s Anomie—Academy Chancellors explore the shifting definition of the art form.

Tracing the Lyric: Mark Doty, Linda Gregerson, and Jane Hirshfield
11:00–11:50 a.m.
The personal sphere and the inner life have long been the domain of the lyric poem. How has this form, and our reading of it, changed over time?  Academy Chancellors share their insights on the lyric poem past and present.

Lunch Break
11:50 a.m.–12:50 p.m.

Reports from Around the World: Khaled Mattawa, Naomi Shihab Nye, and Arthur Sze
1:00–1:50 p.m.
Academy Chancellors discuss their experiences with poetry and poets from other countries. What does the poetry culture look like abroad? Which books and poets from around the world should we be reading?

Projects-in-Progress: Marilyn Nelson, Alicia Ostriker, Alberto Ríos
2:00–2:50 p.m.
Academy Chancellors discuss new poetic projects they are currently working on, including state poet laureate efforts and poems about the city, as well as long-cherished practices.

Poets Respond: Elizabeth Alexander, Juan Felipe Herrera, Claudia Rankine
3:00–3:50 p.m.
How poets and the poetry community respond to tragic events and challenges facing our country and the world today.

American Poets Magazine Publication Party
7:00–9:00 p.m.
Location: Wollman Hall, The New School, 65 West 11th Street, 5th Floor

Join us for a reading and reception featuring 2015 Walt Whitman Award winner Sjohnna McCray, in celebration of the new fall/winter issue of American Poets, the Academy’s biannual magazine. This event is free and open to the public.

Poets Forum is cosponsored by The New School Creative Writing Program and The New York University Creative Writing Program. The program is also made possible, in part, by support from the National Endowment of the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Admission fee: $105.00
6:30pm to 9:00pm
Various Venues 10011 New York, New York
Oct 07 2015

Poetry Forum: Deborah Landau

Deborah Landau is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently The Uses of the Body (Copper Canyon Press, 2015) and The Last Usable Hour, a Lannan Literary Selection published by Copper Canyon in 2011. Her first book, Orchidelirium, was selected by Naomi Shihab Nye for the Robert Dana Anhinga Prize for Poetry. Her work has appeared in The Paris Review, Tin House, Poetry,The New Yorker, Boston Review, The Kenyon Review, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and elsewhere. Her poems have been widely anthologized in places such as The Best American Erotic Poems, Please Excuse This Poem: 100 New Poets for the Next Generation (Viking 2015), Not for Mothers Only,(Fence Books), Women’s Work: Modern Poets Writing in English, and translated into Mongolian, Romanian, Russian, and Greek. She was educated at Stanford, Columbia, and Brown, where she was a Jacob K. Javits Fellow and received a PhD in English and American Literature. For many years she co-directed the KGB Bar Monday Night Poetry Series and co-hosted the video interview program Open Book on Slate.com. She teaches in and directs the Creative Writing Program at New York University.Moderated by Mark Bibbins, faculty, Creative Writing Program.

The New School
66 W. 12th Street, Room 510
10011 New York, New York
Oct 09 2015

Red Hen Press reading at KGB Bar

Brian Turner’s latest book, My Life as a Foreign Country: A Memoir has been called “Achingly, disturbingly, shockingly beautiful” by Nick Flynn and “a humane, heartbreaking, and expertly crafted work of literature” by Tim O’Brien. My Life as a Foreign Country is published by W.W. Norton & Company in the US and Canada, and by Jonathan Cape/Random House in the UK and Ireland. His two collections of poetry: Here, Bullet (Alice James Books, 2005; Bloodaxe Books, 2007) and Phantom Noise (Alice James Books, 2010; Bloodaxe Books in October of 2010) have also been published in Swedish by Oppenheim forlag. His poems have been published and translated in Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Spanish, and Swedish.

Seema Reza is a poet and essayist based outside of Washington, DC, where she coordinates and facilitates a unique multi-hospital arts program that encourages the use of the arts as a tool for narration, self-care and socialization among a population struggling with emotional and physical injuries. She serves as a council member-at-large for the Transformative Language Arts Network.

Lillian-Yvonne Bertram is a 2014 recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Poetry Fellowship. Her first book, But a Storm is Blowing From Paradise, was selected by Claudia Rankine as the 2010 Benjamin Saltman Award winner and published by Red Hen Press in 2012 and was a 2013 poetry nominee for the Hurston/Wright Foundation Legacy Award for outstanding works of literature published by people of African descent. Her second book, a slice from the cake made of air, is forthcoming from Red Hen Press. Winner of the 2012 Phantom Limb Press chapbook contest, her chapbook cutthroat glamours was published in 2013. She is one-sixth of the poetry collective, Line Assembly. She has been in residence at the Vermont Studio Center, the Montana Artists’ Refuge, has received fellowships from Cave Canem and the Bread Loaf Writers’ and is the recipient of a United States Embassy grant for a writing residency at the Ventspils Writers’ & Translators House in Ventspils, Latvia, in 2014.

85 E 4th St
10003 New York, Washington
Oct 13 2015

Graywolf Poetry Tour - Mary Jo Bang, Nick Flynn and Diane Seuss

Co-sponsored by University of Chicago Creative Writing and Poetics

About "The Last Two Seconds" by Mary Jo Bang: One of Publishers Weekly's Top 10 Poetry Books of the Spring. "The Last Two Seconds" is an astonishing confrontation with time—our experience of it as measured out by our perceptions, our lives, and our machines. In these poems, full of vivid imagery and imaginative logic, Mary Jo Bang captures the difficulties inherent in being human in the twenty-first century, when we set our watches by nuclear disasters, species collapse, pollution, mounting inequalities, warring nations, and our own mortality. This is brilliant and profound work by an essential poet of our time.

About "My Feelings" by Nick Flynn: In "My Feelings", Nick Flynn’s fourth book of poetry, the author makes no claims on anyone else’s. These poems inhabit a continually shifting sense of selfhood, in the attempt to contain quicksilver realms of emotional energy—from grief and panic to gratitude and understanding. A major subject is the death of Flynn’s father, a formerly homeless man suffering from mental illness and delusions of his own grandeur (and made famous recently by Robert De Niro in the film "Being Flynn", based on Nick Flynn’s memoir). What does it mean to lose someone like that, finally, and what is the legacy of fatherhood? Flynn’s jagged, lyrical poems attempt to make sense of these questions and the clutter left behind in our lives. Alongside those elegies are also moving poems about his daughter, his own sense of fatherhood, and his fractured memories of his mother, before she took her own life.

About "Four-Legged Girl" by Diane Seuss: In Diane Seuess’s urgent and rapturous third collection, "Four-Legged Girl", her kaleidoscopic lyricism is on full display. These are hothouse poems written from her personal life, from a childhood lived beside the death of her estranged father to a wild love life as recounted from the streets of New York. The book culminates to the remarkable title poem about the famous turn-of-the-century sideshow freak, the woman with four legs, the body made strange to itself and to others. Seuss’s work is emotional and lyrically rich, but grounded in her wild femininity, her childhood narrative, and her sense of rural Michigan, where she now lives. Perfect for fans of Linda Gregg, Lucie Brock-Broido, and D. A. Powell, "Four-Legged Girl" is a gutsy, sexy book of poems that is poised to make a big splash this fall.

About Mary Jo Bang: Mary Jo Bang is the author of six collections of poems, including "Louise in Love", "The Eye Like a Strange Balloon", "The Bride of E", and "Elegy", which received the National Book Critics Circle Award. She has also recently translated Dante's "Inferno". She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University. She lives in St. Louis, Missouri, and teaches at Washington University.

About Nick Flynn: Nick Flynn is the author of three acclaimed books of poetry, "The Captain Asks for a Show of Hands", "Blind Huber", and "Some Ether", winner of the PEN/Osterweil Award. He is also the author of three memoirs, "The Reenactments", "The Ticking Is the Bomb", and "Another Bullshit Night in Suck City", winner of the PEN/Martha Albrand Award. He is also the author of a play, "Alice Invents a Little Game" and "Alice Always Wins" (2008). He has received fellowships from, among other organizations, The Guggenheim Foundation and The Library of Congress. Some of the venues his poems, essays, and nonfiction have appeared in include the New Yorker, the Paris Review, National Public Radio’s "This American Life", and the New York Times Book Review. His film credits include artistic collaborator and “field poet” on the film "Darwin’s Nightmare" (nominated for an Academy Award for best feature documentary in 2006), as well as executive producer and artistic collaborator on "Being Flynn", the film version of "Another Bullshit Night in Suck City". A professor in the creative writing program at the University of Houston, where he teaches each spring, he then spends the rest of the year in (or near) Brooklyn.

About Diane Seuss: Diane Seuss is the author of two previous poetry collections, "It Blows You Hollow" and "Wolf Lake, White Gown Blown Open", winner of the Juniper Prize for Poetry. Her poems have appeared in Best American Poetry 2014, the Georgia Review, New Orleans Review, Poetry, and elsewhere. She is writer-in-residence at Kalamazoo College and lives in Michigan.

About Srikanth Reddy: Srikanth Reddy is the author of two books of poetry--"Facts for Visitors" (University of California Press, 2004) and "Voyager" (University of California Press, 2011) --as well as a scholarly study, "Changing Subjects: Digressions in Modern American Poetry" (Oxford University Press, 2012). His poems have appeared in various journals, including APR, Grand Street, Fence, and Ploughshares, and his critical writing has been featured in publications such as the New Republic, Raritan, and American Literature. He has held fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Whiting Foundation (in the Humanities), and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and the doctoral program in English at Harvard University, Reddy is an Assistant Professor in English and at the College.

57th Street Books
1301 E. 57th St.
60637 Chicago, Illinois
Oct 13 2015

Local Poetry & Prose: April Lindner

April Lindner, author of two poetry collections (This Bed Our Bodies Shaped and Skin) and three Young Adult novels (Jane, Catherine, and Love, Lucy), reads selections from her works, and answers your questions about the writing process.

Elsmere Library
30 Spruce Avenue
19805 Wilmington, Delaware

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A drift of torn cloud, daylight
that’s open and clear.  The grackles
wheeze and groan like old
retired gamblers as they wander
and gather.  A sleeping rhythm
in the day, and then sometimes
the wind comes through and makes 
them lift and fall, the crowds
of leaves that were motionless
and silent until now
		Chet Baker, Amsterdam, 1988  

A single spot slides the trumpet’s flare then stops
    at that face, the extraordinary ruins thumb-marked
with the hollows of heroin, the rest chiaroscuroed.
    Amsterdam, the final gig, canals & countless

stone bridges arc, glimmered in lamps. Later this week
Its face, as long as an arm, looks down & down.
Then the iron gate sound of the cage swings shut
above the bed, a bell as big as the room: quarter-
moon of the head, its nose, its whole lean body
pressed against its cell . . .
I watched my father hit a horse in the face once.
It had come down to feed across