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poet

William Makepeace Thackeray

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William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

by this poet

poem
  Dear LUCY, you know what my wish is,—
    I hate all your Frenchified fuss:
  Your silly entres and made dishes
    Were never intended for us.
  No footman in lace and in ruffles
    Need dangle behind my arm-chair;
  And never mind seeking for truffles,
    Although they be ever so rare.

  But a plain
poem
  "A surgeon of the United States' army says that on inquiring of
  the Captain of his company, he found that NINE-TENTHS of the men
  had enlisted on account of some female difficulty."—Morning Paper.

Ye Yankee Volunteers!
  It makes my bosom bleed
  When I your story read,
     Though oft 'tis told one
poem
  When moonlike ore the hazure seas
    In soft effulgence swells,
  When silver jews and balmy breaze
    Bend down the Lily's bells;
  When calm and deap, the rosy sleep
    Has lapt your soal in dreems,
  R Hangeline! R lady mine!
    Dost thou remember Jeames?

  I mark thee in the Marble All,
    Where