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Thomas Lux

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Thomas Lux
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Thomas Lux was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, on December 10, 1946, and attended Emerson College and the University of Iowa.

His numerous books of poetry include To the Left of Time (Mariner Books, 2016), Child Made of Sand (Houghton Mifflin, 2012); God Particles (Houghton Mifflin, 2008); The Cradle Place (Houghton Mifflin, 2004); The Street of Clocks (Houghton Mifflin, 2001); New and Selected Poems, 1975-1995 (Houghton Mifflin, 1997), which was a finalist for the 1998 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; Split Horizon (Houghton Mifflin, 1994), for which he received the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; Tarantulas on the Lifebuoy (Ampersand Books, 1983); The Glassblower's Breath (Cleveland State University Press, 1976); Memory's Handgrenade (Pym-Randall, 1972); and The Land Sighted (Pym-Randall, 1970).

The late Stanley Kunitz noted that “[Lux is] sui generis, his own kind of poet, unlike any of the fashions of his time.” Rita Dove, writing for the Washington Post Book World, has said, “Try Lux on for size. He’ll pinch in places, soothe in others, but I predict one thing: you may never fit the same way in your own skin again.”

Lux held the post as poet in residence at Emerson College (1972-1975) and was a member of the writing faculty at Sarah Lawrence College and the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers. He also taught at the University of Iowa, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Irvine, among others. He was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award and received three National Endowment for the Arts grants and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

He lived in Atlanta, where he served as the Bourne Professor of Poetry and director of the McEver Visiting Writers program at the Georgia Institute of Technology until his death. He died on February 5, 2017.




Selected Bibliography

Child Made of Sand (Houghton Mifflin, 2012)
God Particles (Houghton Mifflin, 2008)
The Cradle Place (Houghton Mifflin, 2004)
The Street of Clocks (Houghton Mifflin, 2001)
New and Selected Poems, 1975-1995 (Houghton Mifflin, 1997)
The Blind Swimmer: Selected Early Poems, 1970-1975 (Adastra Press, 1996)
Split Horizon (Houghton Mifflin, 1994)
Pecked to Death by Swans (Adastra Press, 1993)
A Boat in the Forest (Adastra Press, 1992)
The Drowned River: New Poems (Houghton Mifflin, 1990)
Half Promised Land (Houghton Mifflin, 1986)
Tarantulas on the Lifebuoy (Ampersand Books, 1983)
Massachusetts (Pym-Randall, 1981)
Like a Wide Anvil from the Moon the Light (Black Market Press, 1980
Sunday (Houghton Mifflin, 1979)
The Glassblower's Breath (Cleveland State University Press, 1976)
Memory's Handgrenade (Pym-Randall, 1972)
The Land Sighted (Pym-Randall, 1970)

by this poet

poem

The devil’s in my neck.
Everything I hear is overviolined,
even the wind, even the wind.
It’s like walking in nurdles up to my chest,
squeaky and slow.
It’s spring, the blooming branches
nearly hide the many dead ones.
A squirrel, digging for a nut, upends my frail
tomato

poem
   Boil it down: feet, skin, gristle,
   bones, vertebrae, heart muscle, boil
   it down, skim, and boil
   again, dreams, history, add them and boil
   again, boil and skim
   in closed cauldrons, boil your horse, his hooves,
   the runned-over dog you loved, the girl
   by the pencil sharpener
   who looked at
2
poem
weren't built to let the sunlight in.
They were large to let the germs out. 
When polio, which sounds like the first dactyl
of a jump rope song, was on the rage,
you did not swim in public waters.
The awful thing was an iron lung.
We lined up in our underwear to get the shot.
Some kids fainted, we all were stung