poem index

poet

Sam Hamill

, United States
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Sam Hamill
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Sam Hamill was born in 1943 and raised in Utah. He attended the University of California–Santa Barbara, where he served as the editor of the university’s literary magazine. In 1972, with money from a prize he was awarded for editorial excellence, he cofounded Copper Canyon Press along with Tree Swenson and William O’Daly.

The following year, Hamill published his first poetry collection, Heroes of the Teton Mythos (Copper Canyon Press, 1973). He went on to write numerous books of poetry, including After Morning Rain (Tiger Bark Press), published posthumously in 2018; Habitation: Collected Poems (Lost Horse Press, 2014); Destination Zero: Poems 1970-1995 (White Pine Press, 1995); and Triada (Copper Canyon Press, 1978).

Hamill also published four books of literary prose, including A Poet’s Work: The Other Side of Poetry (Broken Moon Press, 1990), and many works of translation, including Lao Tzu’s Tao Te Ching (Shambhala Publications, 2005) and Matsuo Bashō’s Narrow Road to the Interior (Shambhala Publications, 1998). He edited several volumes of poetry as well, including The Gift of Tongues: Twenty-five Years of Poetry from Copper Canyon Press (Copper Canyon Press, 1996).

About Hamill, Hayden Carruth wrote, “No one—I mean no one—has done the momentous work of presenting poetry better than Sam Hamill. His editing and publishing, his criticism and translations, his own very strong and beautiful poems have been making a difference in American culture for many years.”

Hamill served as the editor of Copper Canyon Press from 1972 until 2004. In 2003, he began Poets Against the War, a movement of poets protesting the invasion of Iraq, and edited an anthology of the same name, Poets Against the War (Nation Books, 2003). He also served as the director of the Port Townsend Writer’s Conference for ten years.

Hamill received numerous honors and awards, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the U.S.-Japan Friendship Commission, as well as the First Amendment Award from PEN USA, the Stanley Lindberg Award for lifetime achievement in editing, and two Washington Governor’s Arts Awards, among others. He died in Anacortes, Washington, on April 14, 2018. 


Bibliography

Poetry
After Morning Rain (Tiger Bark Press, 2018)
Habitation: Collected Poems (Lost Horse Press, 2014)
Measured by Stone (Curbstone Press, 2007)
Almost Paradise: Selected Poems & Translations (Shambhala Publications, 2005)
Dumb Luck (BOA Editions, 2002)
Gratitude (BOA Editions, 1998)
Destination Zero: Poems 1970-1995 (White Pine Press, 1995)
Mandala (Milkweed Editions, 1991)
A Dragon in the Clouds: Poems and Translations (Broken Moon Press, 1989)
Nootka Rose (Breitenbush Books, 1987)
Fatal Pleasure (Breitenbush Books, 1984)
Requiem (Copper Canyon Press, 1983)
Animae (Copper Canyon Press, 1980)
Triada (Copper Canyon Press, 1978)
The Calling Across Forever (Copper Canyon Press, 1976)
Uintah Blue (Copper Canyon Press, 1975)
Heroes of the Teton Mythos (Copper Canyon Press, 1973)

Prose
A Poet’s Work: The Other Side of Poetry (Broken Moon Press, 1990)
At Home in the World (Jawbone Press, 1981)

by this poet

poem

What the mouth sings, the soul must learn to forgive.
A rat’s as moral as a monk in the eyes of the real world.
Still, the heart is a river
pouring from itself, a river that cannot be crossed.

It opens on a bay
and turns back upon itself as the tide come sin,
it carries the cry

poem

Late afternoon, autumn equinox,
and my daughter and I
are at the table silently
eating fried eggs and muffins,
sharp cheese, and yesterday’s
rice warmed over. We put
our paper plates in the woodstove
and go outside:
                                 sunlight
fills the

poem
Just as I wonder 
whether it's going to die, 
the orchid blossoms 

and I can't explain why it 
moves my heart, why such pleasure 

comes from one small bud 
on a long spindly stem, one 
blood red gold flower 

opening at mid-summer, 
tiny, perfect in its hour. 

Even to a white-
haired craggy poet, it's 
purely