poem index

poet

Rick Barot

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Rick Barot
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Rick Barot was born in the Philippines in 1969 and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. He studied at Wesleyan University and The Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa.

Barot is the author of three books of poetry: Chord (Sarabande Books, 2015), winner of the 2016 UNT Rilke Prize, the PEN Open Book Award, and the Publishing Triangle’s Thom Gunn Award; Want (Sarabande Books, 2008), winner of the 2009 Grub Street Book Prize; and The Darker Fall (Sarabande Books, 2002), winner of the Kathryn A. Morton Prize.

Barot is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Artist Trust of Washington, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and Stanford University, where he served as a Wallace E. Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer in Poetry.

The poetry editor of New England Review, Barot also teaches at Pacific Lutheran University, where he is the director of the low-residency MFA program, The Rainier Writing Workshop. He lives in Tacoma, Washington.


Bibliography

Chord (Sarabande Books, 2015)
Want (Sarabande Books, 2008)
The Darker Fall (Sarabande Books, 2002)

by this poet

poem

Because I am reading Frank O’Hara
while sitting on a bench at the Brooklyn Promenade

I am aware it is 10:30 in New York
on a Tuesday morning

the way O’Hara was always aware
of what day and hour and season were in front of him

It is 12:20 in New York a Friday
he wrote

2
poem

This is my pastoral: that used-car lot
where someone read Song of Myself over the loudspeaker

all afternoon, to customers who walked among the cars
mostly absent to what they heard,

except for the one or two who looked up
into the air, as though they recognized the reckless

poem

The man sitting behind me
is telling the man sitting next to him about his heart bypass.

Outside the train’s window, the landscapes smear by—
the earnest, haphazard distillations of America. The backyards

and back sides of houses. The back lots of shops
and factories. The undersides of