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poet

Norman Dubie

1945- , Barre , VT , United States
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Norman Dubie
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On April 10, 1945, Norman Dubie was born in Barre, Vermont. He began writing poetry at eleven, and was influenced by John Keats and D. H. Lawrence. During Dubie's childhood, his father had a religious conversion, began studying theology, and moved the family to New Hampshire. The young Dubie watched his father become politically active in his parish and encourage support of the civil rights movement.

After finishing high school, Dubie had hoped to play football for West Point, but instead followed his father's wishes and enrolled at the University of New Hampshire at Durham, where he failed every subject except English and Geology. Dubie took nine months off from his studies and was later rejected by the draft due to high blood pressure. He enrolled at Goddard College in Vermont and received his BA in 1965. He then received a fellowship from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he earned his MFA in 1968, as well as an invitation to stay on as a member of the program's regular faculty.

Dubie's first book, Alehouse Sonnets, was written during a blizzard while he was still a graduate student. The manuscript of poems was chosen as a runner-up for the International Poetry Forum Prize and was later published by the University of Pittsburg Press in 1971. Richard Howard, one of the poets on the jury, urged Dubie to establish an MFA program at Arizona State University in Tempe, and in 1975 Dubie accepted a position there as consultant in the arts and launched their creative writing program, though he did not accept the title of director.

During 1975, Dubie published four books of poetry, and a year later received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Since then, he has published numerous collections of poetry, including The Quotations of Bone (Copper Canyon Press, 2015); The Volcano (Copper Canyon Press, 2010); The Insomniac Liar of Topo (Copper Canyon Press, 2007); Ordinary Mornings of a Coliseum (Copper Canyon Press, 2004); The Mercy Seat: Collected & New Poems 1967-2001 (Copper Canyon Press, 2001), Selected and New Poems (W. W. Norton, 1986), and The Clouds of Magellan (Recursos de Santa Fe, 1992). His work has been translated into more than thirty languages.

In an interview published in American Poetry Review, Dubie said that he aims to "challenge whatever the assumed limits of the lyric are." He is well known for poems that invoke the characters and voices of other writers and artists such as Chekhov, Proust, Ingmar Bergman, Rodin, and many others.

Dubie has received the Bess Hokin Prize from the Poetry Foundation and the 2002 PEN Center USA Literary Award for Poetry, as well as fellowships and grants from the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He lives and teaches in Tempe, Arizona.


Selected Bibliography

The Quotations of Bone (Copper Canyon Press, 2015)
The Volcano (Copper Canyon Press, 2010)
The Insomniac Liar of Topo (Copper Canyon Press, 2007)
Ordinary Mornings of a Coliseum (Copper Canyon Press, 2004)
The Mercy Seat: Collected & New Poems 1967-2001 (Copper Canyon Press, 2001)
Selected and New Poems (W. W. Norton, 1983) 
The Clouds of Magellan (Recursos de Santa Fe, 1992)
In the Dead of the Night (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1976)
Alehouse Sonnets (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1971)

by this poet

poem

There were carols on the kitchen radio, a late
cold night, entering the room
while straightening the blistered Navajo rug, I
remembered suddenly what the first eight notes
of hark, the herald angels sing felt like
vibrating through my body that first time—
I was eleven and

2
poem
You were never told, Mother, how old Illya  was drunk
That last holiday, for five days and nights

He stumbled through Petersburg forming
A choir of mutes, he dressed them in pink ascension gowns

And, then, sold Father's Tirietz stallion so to rent
A hall for his Christmas recital: the audience

Was rowdy but
poem
The birches stand in their beggar's row:
Each poor tree
Has had its wrists nearly
Torn from the clear sleeves of bone,
These icy trees
Are hanging by their thumbs
Under a sun
That will begin to heal them soon,
Each will climb out
Of its own blue, oval mouth;
The river groans,
Two birds call out from the woods