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poet

Maureen Seaton

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Maureen Seaton was born in 1947 in Elizabeth, New Jersey, and received an MFA in creative writing from Vermont College. Her debut book of poetry, The Sea Among the Cupboards (New Rivers, 1992), was awarded the Capricorn Poetry Prize and the Society of Midland Authors Award.

She is the author of five additional poetry collections, including Cave of the Yellow Volkswagen (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2009); Little Ice Age (Invisible Cities Press, 2001), which was nominated for a National Book Award; and Furious Cooking (University of Iowa Press, 1996), winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize and the Lambda Literary Award.

On writing and teaching, Seaton says, “I love poems born of chaos and into hybridism. I love popular culture, subversive styles, feminizing and queering traditional form; but I’m equally at home in the middle of a lesson on the terza rima or ancient Japanese court poetry.”

Seaton is also the author of Sex Talks to Girls (University of Wisconsin Press, 2008), winner of the Lambda Literary Award for lesbian memoir. Among her numerous honors and awards are the Iowa Poetry Prize, the Publishing Triangle’s Audre Lorde Award, two Pushcart Prizes, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Illinois Arts Council. She currently teaches at the University of Miami and lives in Florida.


Bibliography

Poetry
Cave of the Yellow Volkswagen (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2009)
Venus Examines Her Breast (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2004
Little Ice Age (Invisible Cities Press, 2001
Furious Cooking (University of Iowa Press, 1996)
Fear of Subways (Eighth Mountain, 1991)
The Sea Among the Cupboards (New Rivers, 1992)

Prose
Sex Talks to Girls (University of Wisconsin Press, 2008)

by this poet

poem
for Etta Silver (1913–2013)		
	

This is where the poem holds its breath,
where the usable truth sways, sorrowing,

and the people sway with the truth of it,
and this is where the poem enters the dark.

This is where the book closes and the clock 
opens and the clock closes and the book 

opens to song so
poem

I love Fresh Market but always feel underdressed
squeezing overpriced limes. Louis Vuitton,
Gucci, Fiorucci, and all the ancient East Coast girls
with their scarecrow limbs and Joker grins.
Their silver fox husbands, rosy from tanning beds,
steady their ladies who shuffle along in Miu Miu’s

poem

The first time I saw hundreds of fiddlehead ferns boiling in an enormous pot I realized
what an odd person I must be to hear tiny cries from the mouths of cooking vegetables.

Similarly, when you hurt me, I curled like a