poem index

poet

Donald Hall

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Donald Hall was born on September 20, 1928, and grew up in Hamden, Connecticut. He began writing as an adolescent and attended the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference at the age of sixteen—the same year he had his first work published. He earned a BA from Harvard University in Boston in 1951 and a bachelor of letters degree from the University of Oxford in England 1953. The next year he received a Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University, followed by a fellowship from Harvard University.

in 1955 Hall published his first poetry collection, Exiles and Marriages (Viking Press), which was the Academy of American Poet's Lamont Poetry Selection for 1956. His other books include The Selected Poems of Donald Hall (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015); The Painted Bed (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2002); and Without: Poems (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1998), which was published on the third anniversary of his wife and fellow poet Jane Kenyon's death from leukemia and which received the 1999 L. L. Winship/PEN New England Award. Other notable collections include The One Day (Mariner Books, 1988), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and a Pulitzer Prize nomination andThe Happy Man (Secker & Warburg, 1986), which won the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize.

Of Hall's work, Billy Collins writes, "Hall has long been placed in the Frostian tradition of the plainspoken rural poet. His reliance on simple, concrete diction and the no-nonsense sequence of the declarative sentence gives his poems steadiness and imbues them with a tone of sincere authority. It is a kind of simplicity that succeeds in engaging the reader in the first few lines."

Besides poetry, Donald Hall wrote numerous books of prose, including works about baseball, the sculptor Henry Moore, and the poet Marianne Moore. He also wrote children's books, including Ox-Cart Man (Viking Press, 1979), which won the Caldecott Medal; short stories, including Willow Temple: New and Selected Stories (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2003); and plays. He published several autobiographical works, such as The Best Day The Worst Day: Life with Jane Kenyon (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005) and Life Work (Beacon Press, 1993), which won the New England Book Award for nonfiction.

Hall edited more than two dozen textbooks and anthologies, including The Oxford Book of Children's Verse in America (Oxford University Press, 1985) and Contemporary American Poetry (Penguin Books, 1962). He served as poetry editor of The Paris Review from 1953 to 1962 and as a member of editorial board for poetry at Wesleyan University Press from 1958 to 1964. He taught at the University of Michigan from 1957 to 1975.

His honors include two Guggenheim fellowships, the Poetry Society of America's Robert Frost Medal, a Lifetime Achievement award from the New Hampshire Writers and Publisher Project, and the Ruth Lilly Prize for poetry. Hall also served as Poet Laureate of New Hampshire from 1984 to 1989. In December 1993 he and Jane Kenyon were the subject of an Emmy Award-winning Bill Moyers documentary A Life Together. In June 2006, Hall was appointed the Library of Congress's fourteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry. In 2010, he received a National Medal of Arts from President Barack Obama. Hall died on June 23, 2018, in Wilmot, New Hampshire.


Selected Bibliography

Poetry
The Selected Poems of Donald Hall (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2015)
The Back Chamber (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011)
White Apples and the Taste of Stone: Selected Poems 1946–2006 (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2006)
The Painted Bed (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2002)
Without (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1998)
The Old Life (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1996)
The Museum of Clear Ideas (Ticknor & Fields, 1996)
Old and New Poems (Ticknor & Fields, 1990)
The One Day (Mariner Books, 1991)
The Happy Man (Secker & Warburg, 1986)
Kicking the Leaves: Poems (Harper & Row, 1978)
The Town of Hill (D. R. Godine, 1975)
A Blue Wing Tilts at the Edge of the Sea: Selected Poems, 1964–1974 (Seckler and Warburg, 1975)
The Yellow Room: Love Poems (Harper & Row, 1971)
The Alligator Bride: Poems, New and Selected (Ox Head Press, 1969)
A Roof of Tiger Lilies (A. Deutsch, 1964)
The Dark Houses (Viking Press, 1958)
Exiles and Marriages (Viking Press, 1955)
To the Loud Wind and Other Poems (Harvard Advocate, 1955)

Prose
A Carnival of Losses: Notes Nearing Ninety (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018)
Essays After Eighty (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014)
Unpacking the Boxes: A Memoir of a Life in Poetry (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2008)
The Best Day The Worst Day: Life with Jane Kenyon (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005)
Willow Temple: New & Selected Stories (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2003)
Principal Products of Portugal: Prose Pieces (Beacon Press, 1995)
Death to the Death of Poetry: Essays, Reviews, Notes, Interviews (University of Michigan Press, 1994)
Life Work (Beacon Press, 1993)
Poetry and Ambition (University of Michigan Press, 1988)
Fathers Playing Catch with Sons: Essays on Sport (Mostly Baseball) (North Point Press, 1985)
The Weather for Poetry: Essays, Reviews, and Notes on Poetry, 1977–81 (University of Michigan Press, 1982)
To Keep Moving: Essays, 1959-1969 (Hobart & William Smith Colleges Press, 1980)
Goatfoot Milktongue Twinbird: Interviews, Essays, and Notes on Poetry, 1970–76 (University of Michigan Press, 1978)
Remembering Poets: Reminiscences and Opinions--Dylan Thomas, Robert Frost, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound (Harper & Row, 1978)
Writing Well (Little, Brown, 1973)
The Pleasures of Poetry (Harper & Row, 1971)
Marianne Moore: The Cage and the Animal (Pegasus Books, 1970)
Henry Moore: The Life and Work of a Great Sculptor (Harper & Row, 1966)
String Too Short to Be Saved: Recollections of Summers on a New England Farm (Viking Press, 1961)

For Children
Lucy's Christmas (Browndeer Press, 1994)
Ox-Cart Man (Viking Press, 1979)
Riddle Rat (F. Warne, 1977)
Andrew the Lion Farmer (F. Watts, 1959)

by this poet

poem
           1
"Up, down, good, bad," said
the man with the tubes
up his nose, " there's lots
of variety…
However, notions
of balance between
extremes of fortune
are stupid—or at
best unobservant."
He watched as the nurse
fed pellets into
the green nozzle that
stuck from his side. "Mm,"
said the man. " Good. Yum
poem
When I walk in my house I see pictures,
bought long ago, framed and hanging
—de Kooning, Arp, Laurencin, Henry Moore—
that I've cherished and stared at for years,
yet my eyes keep returning to the masters 
of the trivial—a white stone perfectly round, 
tiny lead models of baseball players, a cowbell, 
a broken
poem
"Even when I danced erect
by the Nile’s garden
I constructed Necropolis.

Ten million fellaheen cells
of my body floated stones
to establish a white museum."

Grisly, foul, and terrific
is the speech of bones,
thighs and arms slackened

into desiccated sacs of flesh
hanging from an armature
where muscle was, and

collected in

collection
While sports fans may not be widely known for their literary passions,...