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Claude McKay

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Claude McKay
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Claude McKay was born in Jamaica on September 15, 1889. He was educated by his older brother, who possessed a library of English novels, poetry, and scientific texts.

In 1912, McKay published a book of verse called Songs of Jamaica (Gardner), recording his impressions of black life in Jamaica in dialect. That same year, he traveled to the United States to attend Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. He remained there only a few months, leaving to study agriculture at Kansas State University.

In 1917, he published two sonnets, "The Harlem Dancer" and "Invocation," and later used the form in writing about social and political concerns from his perspective as a black man in the United States. McKay also wrote on a variety of subjects, from his Jamaican homeland to romantic love, with a use of passionate language.

During the twenties, McKay developed an interest in Communism and traveled to Russia and then to France, where he met Edna St. Vincent Millay and Lewis Sinclair. In 1934, McKay moved back to the United States and lived in Harlem, New York. Losing faith in Communism, he turned his attention to the teachings of various spiritual and political leaders in Harlem, eventually converting to Catholicism.

McKay's viewpoints and poetic achievements in the earlier part of the twentieth century set the tone for the Harlem Renaissance and gained the deep respect of younger black poets of the time, including Langston Hughes. He died on May 22, 1948.

Selected Bibliography

The Passion of Claude McKay: Selected Poetry and Prose (Schocken Books, 1973)
The Dialectic Poetry of Claude McKay (Books for Libraries Press, 1972)
Selected Poems (Bookman Associates, 1953)
Harlem Shadows (Harcourt, Brace, 1922)
Constab Ballads (Watts, 1912)
Songs of Jamaica (Gardner, 1912)

The Negroes in America (Associated Faculty Press, 1979)
Harlem: Negro Metropolis (Dutton, 1940)
A Long Way from Home (Furman, 1937)

My Green Hills of Jamaica (Heinemann Educational Books, 1979)
Trial By Lynching (University of Mysore Press, 1977)
Banana Bottom (Harper, 1933)
Gingertown (Harper, 1932)
Banjo: A Story Without a Plot (Harper, 1929)
Home to Harlem (Harper, 1928)

by this poet

If we must die—let it not be like hogs
Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot,
While round us bark the mad and hungry dogs,
Making their mock at our accursed lot.
If we must die—oh, let us nobly die,
So that our precious blood may not be shed
In vain; then even the monsters we defy
Shall be constrained to honor

Some day, when trees have shed their leaves
    And against the morning’s white
The shivering birds beneath the eaves
    Have sheltered for the night,
We’ll turn our faces southward, love,
    Toward the summer isle
Where bamboos spire to shafted grove
    And wide-mouthed


I plucked my soul out of its secret place,
And held it to the mirror of my eye,
To see it like a star against the sky,
A twitching body quivering in space,
A spark of passion shining on my face.
And I explored it to determine why
This awful key to my infinity
Conspires to rob me