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About this poet

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

At the Zoo

First I saw the white bear, then I saw the black;
Then I saw the camel with a hump upon his back;
Then I saw the grey wolf, with mutton in his maw;
Then I saw the wombat waddle in the straw;
Then I saw the elephant a-waving of his trunk;
Then I saw the monkeys—mercy, how unpleasantly they smelt!

This poem is in the public domain.

This poem is in the public domain.

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

by this poet

poem
    Ye Genii of the nation,
    Who look with veneration.
  And Ireland's desolation onsaysingly deplore;
    Ye sons of General Jackson,
    Who thrample on the Saxon,
  Attend to the thransaction upon Shannon shore,

    When William, Duke of Schumbug,
    A tyrant and a humbug,
  With cannon and with thunder
poem
  FROM UHLAND.

  "Es pflückte Blümlein mannigfalt."

  A little girl through field and wood
    Went plucking flowerets here and there,
  When suddenly beside her stood
    A lady wondrous fair!

  The lovely lady smiled, and laid
    A wreath upon the maiden's brow;
  "Wear it, 'twill blossom soon," she said
poem
  Beneath the gold acacia buds
  My gentle Nora sits and broods,
  Far, far away in Boston woods
                  My gentle Nora!

  I see the tear-drop in her e'e,
  Her bosom's heaving tenderly;
  I know—I know she thinks of me,
                  My Darling Nora!

  And where am I?  My love, whilst thou