About this poet

Erika Meitner is the author of Copia (BOA Editions, 2014); Ideal Cities (Harper Collins, 2010), a winner in the 2009 National Poetry Series; and Inventory at the All-Night Drugstore (Anhinga Press, 2003), winner of the 2002 Anhinga-Robert Dana Prize.

Untitled [and the moon once it stopped was sleeping]

Erika Meitner

and the moon         once it stopped         was sleeping

in the cold blue light          and the moon          while the wind snapped

vinyl siding apart          slipped around corners          whipped the neighbors'

carefully patterned bunchgrass          our snow-filled vegetable boxes

the house unjoining              the moon       our yard strips          covered with

hollow shells          of hard remnants               ice      and my son's breath

contiguous               static          a shard of green light          on the monitor

wavers with coughs                     the Baptist church                     in Catawba

the only place lit up          down the mountain          past midnight, someone

waving their hands             at something          so quiet              you can hear

the wind tear          at the houses          you can hear          the neighbor

coming home          though he's .18 acres          away          it's too late

for that feeling          (possibility)          the night       always   held

the wind                   is at it                    again            cracking

paint            on the walls              one day          it will            unroot us

one day        the wind        will tally        our losses

but        not yet             the moon        not yet

Copyright © 2011 by Erika Meitner. Used with permission of the author.

Copyright © 2011 by Erika Meitner. Used with permission of the author.

Erika Meitner

Erika Meitner is the author of Copia (BOA Editions, 2014); Ideal Cities (Harper Collins, 2010), a winner in the 2009 National Poetry Series; and Inventory at the All-Night Drugstore (Anhinga Press, 2003), winner of the 2002 Anhinga-Robert Dana Prize.

by this poet

poem

Hand-painted on the side
of a shack we pass
on the road to Ohio:
what this world comin to?

This is not haiku. This
is more like fog and we’re
socked in and your body

is invisible and right
across from me
simultaneously.

How much ammo you got