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About this Poem 

“One need not be a house,” “I push a petal from my Gown,” and “Shall I – bloom?” are from Thomas H. Johnson’s Final Harvest: Emily Dickinson (Little, Brown and Company, 1962).

from “Twin Flower, Master, Emily”

Dear Emily,

For poetry – I have you. One need not be a House – One need not be a Nation or a Master for that matter. Delicate and beautiful, common in rich mossy woods, in pairs, we live. We are crimson-pink, particularly in the mountains. The rough terrain is not visible to many, but somewhat green and fatigued, demilitarized! A nod from far away is hollow. True men – How shall I greet them? Nation building is kind and generous. It is common to decline it. Emily, Shall I – bloom?

Yours, Twin Flower   

From The Morning News Is Exciting (Action Books, 2010). Copyright © 2010 by Don Mee Choi. Used with the permission of the author.

From The Morning News Is Exciting (Action Books, 2010). Copyright © 2010 by Don Mee Choi. Used with the permission of the author.

Don Mee Choi

Don Mee Choi

Don Mee Choi is the author of Hardly War (Wave Books, 2016) and The Morning News Is Exciting (Action Books, 2010). She is the recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award and the 2012 Lucien Stryk Translation Prize. She lives in Seattle.

by this poet

poem

Wieners
Canned fruit
Crackers
Soluble coffee
Milk powder
Granulated sugar
Tin of jam
Cookie sandwich
Fudge
or
Radish Soup
Birthday Seaweed Soup
Pan-fried Spam with kimchi
Strictly lard
so
What did General Fatty eat?

poem

—tête-à-tête of flowers—

(still at the ambassador’s garden party in the middle of Seoul)

ROSE OF SHARON

How do you do
Mr. Ambassador?

 

DECLASSIFIED

poem

1950 June 27: my father heard the sound of the engine of a North Korean fighter plane, Yak-9. Foremostly and therefore barely consequently in the highest manner, he followed the