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About this poet

Sarah Gambito is the author of Delivered (Persea Books, 2009) and Matadora (Alice James Books, 2004). Her latest collection, Loves You, is forthcoming from Persea Book in 2019. She is cofounder of Kundiman, a nonprofit organization serving Asian American writers. Gambito teaches at Fordham University and lives in New York City.

Toro

I'm looking for the good robin of everlasting sewing.

Easy as a bed to bed.

And his words are mints.

My shock in the ghost of the guest of my boyfriend.

First there is the Father.

He would not like me to tell you about him.

He is punching holes right now.  Saying petit, petit, petit.

Garbled—he can seem like a balloon.  Such a skin. A kingfisher.

We are afraid to touch him.

Like too many nights of touching ourselves.

He might plan to take us on a picnic.

We must be ready.  We must be hungry.

I finished my blue necklace.

She tries to convince him because he was here on earth.

Dad quits his job for the umpteenth time.

I'm wicked lonely.

We are in a department store.

I buy him a blue bracelet because it is right there.

And I would wear it.

I buy it hoping he bought me something for Christmas.

This is never true of course.

We talk about religion.  Of jasper things in trees.

He wears an engagement ring.

I am shivery, full of V-8.

He drinks too much and cheats all the time.

All of whom he left behind in the Bible belt are singing Yes, yes yes

We put our hands over our face, our neck.

We are overcome, saying, "No, no. I can't. I can't."

First published in FIELD: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, published by Oberlin College Press. Copyright © by Sarah Gambito. All rights reserved.

First published in FIELD: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics, published by Oberlin College Press. Copyright © by Sarah Gambito. All rights reserved.

Sarah Gambito

Sarah Gambito

Sarah Gambito is the author of Delivered (Persea Books, 2009) and Matadora (Alice James Books, 2004). 

by this poet

poem

How much our hands are God’s

to be running fingers over braille cities.

We are this hand pushed through our womb.

Weeping with each other’s blood in our eyes.

I dreamed that I slept with the light on.

I was asleep in my mother’s bed because my father was out to sea

and my claim

poem
The best thing of all is to take the enemy's country whole and intact.
My mother took my heart out.  She banked it on top of her stove.
It glowed white.  She put it back in my chest.

Tita knew that overseas workers often had affairs.
He licked me and I pretended it pinged through my body like a swift idea
That
poem
You will transcend your ancestor’s suffering

You will pick a blue ball. You will throw it to yourself. 

You will be on the other side to receive. 

Green leaves grow around your face. 

Hair stands on your body. 

You look at old photographs 

that say:

The bread is warm!

A child is a blessing!

That’s what I
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