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About this poet

Khadijah Queen’s most recent book is I’m So Fine: A List of Famous Men & What I Had On (YesYes Books, 2017). She is also the author of Fearful Beloved (Argos Books, 2015). She teaches in the low-residency Mile-High MFA program at Regis University and is a visiting professor in creative writing at University of Colorado Boulder.

Theory: Synesthesia

First, I was twenty-five with no sleep       (                    )

&         my body said    feel this                     And I didn’t

want to     (             ) then       It turned into a constant &        (         )

burned to be felt        I couldn’t harden

away from it        couldn’t ease             (              )

or sleep or not-feel        my way away           because it was myself &

what my child could see    (             )            & what                I was watching

Originally published in CURA, Issue 14. Copyright © 2014 by Khadijah Queen. Used with the permission of the author.

Originally published in CURA, Issue 14. Copyright © 2014 by Khadijah Queen. Used with the permission of the author.

Khadijah Queen

Khadijah Queen

Khadijah Queen is the author of I’m So Fine: A List of Famous Men & What I Had On (YesYes Books, 2017).

by this poet

poem

so well it’s like you’re my real
lover, the reason I can’t stay
attached to anyone, making a heaven
out of beginning again & you
knock at my voice
as if I could speak you back in
as mine & I had time enough to learn
the secret of cruelty
as if that made it lose

2
poem
Gear adrift I say—a phrasal anchor in me
& here at the summit no one I know
knows what it means. I stay neat & ask
 
What did I imagine better before work
before that last time breaking
One Tuesday I volunteered & never again
 
The drumbeat softens & I still decline to
admit how cowardly &
2
poem

Bamboo shoots on my grandmother's side path
grow denser every year they’re harvested for nuisance.
Breezes peel blush and white petals from her magnolia,
lacing unruly roots in the spring grass. For nine decades
she has seen every season stretch out of shape, this past
Connecticut winter