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October 15, 1964Guggenheim MuseumFrom the Academy Audio Archive

About this poet

Derek Walcott was born in Castries, Saint Lucia, the West Indies, on January 23, 1930. His first published poem, "1944" appeared in The Voice of St. Lucia when he was fourteen years old, and consisted of 44 lines of blank verse. By the age of nineteen, Walcott had self-published two volumes, 25 Poems (1948) and Epitaph for the Young: XII Cantos (1949), exhibiting a wide range of influences, including William Shakespeare, T. S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound.

He later attended the University of the West Indies, having received a Colonial Development and Welfare scholarship, and in 1951 published the volume Poems.

In 1957, he was awarded a fellowship by the Rockefeller Foundation to study the American theater. He published numerous collections of poetry in his lifetime, most recently The Poetry of Derek Walcott 1948-2013 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2014), White Egrets (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010), Selected Poems (2007), The Prodigal: A Poem (2004), and Tiepolo's Hound (2000).

The founder of the Trinidad Theater Workshop, Walcott also wrote several plays produced throughout the United States: The Odyssey: A Stage Version (1992); The Isle is Full of Noises (1982); Remembrance and Pantomime (1980); The Joker of Seville and O Babylon! (1978); Dream on Monkey Mountain and Other Plays (1970); Three Plays: The Last Carnival; Beef, No Chicken; and A Branch of the Blue Nile (1969). His play Dream on Monkey Mountain won the Obie Award for distinguished foreign play of 1971. He founded Boston Playwrights' Theatre at Boston University in 1981.

His first collection of essays, What the Twilight Says (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), was published in 1998.

About his work, the poet Joseph Brodsky said, "For almost forty years his throbbing and relentless lines kept arriving in the English language like tidal waves, coagulating into an archipelago of poems without which the map of modern literature would effectively match wallpaper. He gives us more than himself or 'a world'; he gives us a sense of infinity embodied in the language."

Walcott's honors include a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, the T. S. Eliot Prize, the Montale Prize, a Royal Society of Literature Award, and, in 1988, the Queen's Medal for Poetry. In 1992, Walcott became the first Caribbean writer to receive the 1992 Nobel Prize in Literature, and in 2015, he received the Griffin Trust for Excellence in Poetry's Lifetime Achievement Award. He was an honorary member of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters.

Derek Walcott died on March 17, 2017, in Saint Lucia.


Selected Bibliography

Poetry

The Poetry of Derek Walcott: 1948–2013 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2014)
White Egrets (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010)
Selected Poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007)
The Prodigal: A Poem (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006)
Tiepolo’s Hound (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001)
The Bounty (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1997)
Omeros (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1990)
The Arkansas Testament (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1987)
Collected Poems, 1948­–1984 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1986)
Midsummer (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1984)
The Fortunate Traveller (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1982)
The Star-Apple Kingdom (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1979)
Sea Grapes (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1976)
Another Life (Jonathan Cape, 1973)
The Gulf and Other Poems (Jonathan Cape, 1969)
The Castaway and Other Poems (Jonathan Cape, 1965)
In a Green Night: Poems 1948–1960 (Jonathan Cape, 1962)

Origins [The Flowering Breaker Detonates Its Surf] (audio only)

 

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Derek Walcott

Derek Walcott

Born in 1930, in the West Indies, Derek Walcott received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992.

by this poet

poem
A wind is ruffling the tawny pelt
Of Africa. Kikuyu, quick as flies,
Batten upon the bloodstreams of the veldt.
Corpses are scattered through a paradise.
Only the worm, colonel of carrion, cries:
"Waste no compassion on these separate dead!"
Statistics justify and scholars seize
The salients of colonial policy.
poem
The growing idleness of summer grass
With its frail kites of furious butterflies
Requests the lemonade of simple praise
In scansion gentler than my hammock swings
And rituals no more upsetting than a
Black maid shaking linen as she sings
The plain notes of some Protestant hosanna—
Since I lie idling from the
2
poem
Where are your monuments, your battles, martyrs?
Where is your tribal memory? Sirs,
in that grey vault. The sea. The sea
has locked them up. The sea is History.

First, there was the heaving oil,
heavy as chaos;
then, like a light at the end of a tunnel,

the lantern of a caravel,
and that was Genesis.
Then