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About this Poem 

“Only a Dad” was published in A Heap o’ Livin’ (The Reilly & Lee Co., 1916).

Only a Dad

Only a dad with a tired face, 
Coming home from the daily race, 
Bringing little of gold or fame
To show how well he has played the game; 
But glad in his heart that his own rejoice 
To see him come and to hear his voice. 

Only a dad with a brood of four, 
One of ten million men or more 
Plodding along in the daily strife, 
Bearing the whips and the scorns of life, 
With never a whimper of pain or hate, 
For the sake of those who at home await. 

Only a dad, neither rich nor proud, 
Merely one of the surging crowd
Toiling, striving from day to day, 
Facing whatever may come his way, 
Silent whenever the harsh condemn, 
And bearing it all for the love of them. 

Only a dad but he gives his all
To smooth the way for his children small, 
Doing with courage stern and grim, 
The deeds that his father did for him. 
This is the line that for him I pen: 
Only a dad, but the best of men.

This poem is in the public domain.

This poem is in the public domain.

Edgar Guest

Edgar Guest

Born in 1881 in England, Edgar Guest was a prolific writer whose poems were often fourteen lines long and presented a deeply sentimental view of everyday life.

by this poet

poem
Gettin' together to smile an' rejoice, 
An' eatin' an' laughin' with folks of your choice; 
An' kissin' the girls an' declarin' that they 
Are growin' more beautiful day after day; 
Chattin' an' braggin' a bit with the men, 
Buildin' the old family circle again; 
Livin' the wholesome an' old-fashioned cheer,
poem
When you're up against a trouble, 
    Meet it squarely, face to face; 
Lift your chin and set your shoulders, 
    Plant your feet and take a brace. 
When it's vain to try to dodge it, 
    Do the best that you can do; 
You may fail, but you may conquer, 
    See it through! 


Black may be the clouds about you
poem
Last night he said the dead were dead
  And scoffed my faith to scorn;
I found him at a tulip bed
  When I passed by at morn.

"O ho!" said I, "the frost is near
  And mist is on the hills,
And yet I find you planting here
  Tulips and daffodils."

"'Tis time to plant them now," he said,
  "If they shall bloom