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About this Poem 

“Comrades Four” was first published in Constab Ballads (Watts, 1912). 

Comrades Four

Dear comrades, my comrades,
    My heart is always true;
An’ ever an’ ever
    I shall remember you.

We all joined together,
    Together joined we four;
An’ I have been first to
    Pass t’rough the open door.

We four drilled together,
    Together drilled we all;
An’ I’ve been the first to
    Flee from the life o’ gall.

We parted, dear comrades,
    We parted all in tears,
An’ each went his own way
    To shoulder life’s sad cares.

O comrades, my comrades,
    What is de lasting gain,
But all t’rough de tempest
    A heart of unmixed pain?

My comrades, loved comrades,
    I hear your bitter cry;
But life’s pain will end, boys,
    Will end yet—by an’ by.
 

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

Claude McKay

Claude McKay

Claude McKay, who was born in Jamaica in 1889, wrote about social and political concerns from his perspective as a black man in the United States, as well as a variety of subjects ranging from his Jamaican homeland to romantic love.

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Too wonderful the April night, 
Too faintly sweet the first May flowers, 
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What time of year the

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I hear the halting footsteps of a lass
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Ah, little dark girls who in slippered feet
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Through the long night until the silver