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Recorded at the American Poets Launch Party. The New School, NYC, 2014

About this poet

Kimiko Hahn was born on July 5, 1955, in Mt. Kisco, New York, the child of artists, a Japanese American mother from Hawaii and a German American father from Wisconsin. She received an undergraduate degree in English and east Asian studies from the University of Iowa, and a master's degree in Japanese literature from Columbia University in 1984.

She is the author of nine collections of poetry, including Brain Fever (W. W. Norton, 2014), Toxic Flora (W. W. Norton, 2010),The Narrow Road to the Interior (W.W. Norton, 2006); The Artist's Daughter (2002); Mosquito and Ant (1999); Volatile (1998); and The Unbearable Heart (1995), which received an American Book Award.

Her work often explores desire and death, and the intersections of conflicting identities. She frequently draws on, and even reinvents, classic forms and techniques used by women writers in Japan and China, including the zuihitsu, or pillow book, and nu shu, a nearly extinct script Chinese women used to correspond with one another.

About her own work and its place in Asian American writing, Hahn has said: "I’ve taken years to imagine an Asian American aesthetic. I think it’s a combination of many elements—a reflection of Asian form, an engagement with content that may have roots in historical identity, together with a problematic, and even psychological, relationship to language."

Hahn is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts, as well as a Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writers’ Award, the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize, and an Association of Asian American Studies Literature Award. She is a Distinguished Professor in the English department at Queens College/CUNY and lives in New York.

Alarm

Before doctors learn how it is that the brains lights turn on, they may have to know a lot more about whats happening when the lights are off. 
                        —Benedict Carey
 

In her dark she surveys empty: the vanity
from the in-law's Bronx apartment,

the brooch from a lover,
loafers by a coat tree, trench coat,

the husband's profile, an alarm

for news and forecast. Here
                                              she appraises fidelity
before the light violates.

From Brain Fever (W. W. Norton, 2014). Copyright © 2014 by Kimiko Hahn. Used with permission by W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

From Brain Fever (W. W. Norton, 2014). Copyright © 2014 by Kimiko Hahn. Used with permission by W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Kimiko Hahn

Kimiko Hahn

Kimiko Hahn was born in 1955 in Mt. Kisco, New York.

by this poet

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A map on tissue. A mass of wire. Electricity of the highest order.
Somewhere in this live tangle, scientists discovered—

like shipmates on the suddenly-round earth—
a new catalog of synaptic proteins

presenting how memory is laid down:
At the side of the transmitting neuron

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