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Feb 25 2018

The Journey of Poetry

INSTRUCTOR: Leslie Contreras Schwartz 
TIME: Sundays, February 25th, March 4th, 18th, 25th, 3-6 PM
PRICE: Early-Bird Price $150 for Writespace members, $180 for non-members; After Tuesday, February 20th, $180 for Writespace members, $210 for non-members. 

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Poetry uses language in a way that is not available to us in everyday life. As with a song, a poem can elevate and capture a specific experience--an image, memory, or sensation--and connect people in a powerful way. Whether you are a practiced poet or a total “newbie” who has just wondered what poetry is “about,” this workshop will provide a jump start to get you into a writing practice.Come join us in a supportive, inspiring workshop environment in which we will explore found poetry, song lyrics, spoken word, and literary poetry from a wide range of contemporary authors. We will also study a broad array of craft techniques, including how to use line breaks, stanzas, and sound to heighten meaning. Writers from marginalized communities (writers of color, writers with disabilities, writer from the queer and LGBT community) are encouraged to attend

Admission fee: $180.00
4:00pm
Writespace
2000 Edwards
Suite 212
77450 Houston, Texas
Feb 25 2018

The Manhattan Review Reading Series

Readings by Philip Fried, Suzanne Gardinier, and Christopher Bursk.

Admission fee: $10.00
6:00pm
Cornelia Street Cafe
29 Cornelia Street
10014 New York, New York
Feb 26 2018

Conversation with Linor Goralik & Maria Vassileva

One of the first Russian writers to make a name for herself on the Internet, Linor Goralik writes conversational short works that conjure the absurd in all its forms, reflecting post-Soviet life and daily universals. Her mastery of the minimal, including a wide range of experiments in different forms of micro-prose, is on full display in this collection of poems, stories, comics, a play, and an interview, here translated for the first time. In Goralik's Found Life, speech, condensed to the extreme, captures a vivid picture of fleeting interactions in a quickly moving world. Goralik's works evoke an unconventional palette of moods and atmospheres--slight doubt, subtle sadness, vague unease--through accumulation of unexpected details and command over colloquial language. While calling up a range of voices, her works are marked by a distinct voice, simultaneously slightly naive and deeply ironic. She is a keen observer of the female condition, recounting gendered tribulations with awareness and amusement. From spiritual rabbits and biblical zoos to poems about loss and comics about poetry, Goralik's colorful language and pervasive dark comedy capture the heights of ridiculousness and the depths of grief.

Linor Goralik is an award-winning contemporary Russian writer of flash fiction, poetry, essays, fairy tales, theater, and more. Her boundary-pushing works include fourteen books and dozens of other print and electronic publications. Maria Vassileva is a Ph.D. candidate in Slavic languages and literatures at Harvard University.

7:00pm
PORTER SQUARE BOOKS
25 White Street
02140 Cambridge , Massachusetts
Feb 26 2018

PEN Out Loud with Jason Reynolds and Gregory Pardlo

This February, join bestselling and multi-award winning author Jason Reynolds and Pulitzer Prize winning poet Greg Pardlo in conversation for the launch of the 2018 season of PEN Out Loud, presented in collaboration with PEN America and the Strand Book Store. In a candid author-to-author conversation, they will discuss the vital importance of a literary canon that is representative, contemporary, and hopeful, as they speak about craft, interrogate and celebrate each other’s work, and provide insight into their respective relationship with poetry and prose as a means of expression.

Jason Reynolds is crazy. About stories. The New York Times bestselling author is a National Book Award Finalist, a Kirkus Prize winner, a Walter Dean Myers Award winner, an NAACP Image Award Winner, and the recipient of multiple Coretta Scott King honors. His critically acclaimed debut novel When I Was the Greatest, was followed by The Boy in the Black Suit, All American Boys (cowritten with Brendan Kiely), As Brave As You, and the first two books in the Track series, Ghost and Patina. His recent work includes Long Way Down and Miles Morales: Spider Man. Jason is on faculty at Lesley University, for the Writing for Young People MFA Program, and currently resides in Washington, D.C.

Gregory Pardlo‘s ​collection​ Digest (Four Way Books) won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. His other honors​ include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts; his first collection Totem was selected by Brenda Hillman for the APR/Honickman Prize in 2007. He is Poetry Editor of Virginia Quarterly Review. Air Traffic, a memoir in essays, is forthcoming from Knopf. 

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Admission fee: $15.00
7:00pm
SubCulture
45 Bleecker St
10012 New York, New York
Feb 26 2018

Nancy Huang with Arati Warrier & Kiana Young / Favorite Daughter

In town from Austin, TX, Nancy Huang will be reading from her first book of poems, Favorite Daughter. Reading with her are Bay Area poets Arati Warrier and Kiana Young—join us!
 
Favorite Daughter is a poetry collection trying to uproot America from inside the body, and find where China is buried underneath. Divided into four parts, Daughter explores ideas like navigating hybridity, localism, and harmony in ways that disturb commonly-held notions about broad terms like “belonging” and “cultural struggle.” A compilation of immigration stories, Chinese radio segments, Google translate entries, and dictionary remixes, Huang immerses herself in everything she is uncertain of.
 
Nan Huang (黄洁) is a queer Chinese-American poet. She is a winner of the 2016 Write Bloody Poetry contest, an Andrew Julius Gutow Academy of American Poets Prize, a James F. Parker Award in Poetry, a 2015 YoungArts Finalist prize, and more. She has received fellowships from VONA and Tin House, and is a former member of UT Spitshine. She competed/resisted at CUPSI 2017 in Chicago, where all her poems were nominated for Washington Post's Best of the Rest. Her debut poetry collection, Favorite Daughter, is out by Write Bloody Publishing.
 
Arati Warrier is a South Asian American poet from Austin, TX, by way of diaspora. She graduated from UT, Austin in May 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in English and Asian American Studies. She featured on the final stage at Women of the World Poetry Slam 2014, is a recipient of the Andrew Julius Gutow Academy of American Poets prize, and is a 2014 national collegiate poetry slam champion. Familiar with both the stage and the page, Arati has been on five slam poetry teams, was awarded “Best Poem” at the national collegiate poetry slam, and has been published in Junoesq Literary Magazine and The Aerogram. She has opened for poets like Dominique Christina, Denice Frohman, Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib, sam sax, and Sarah Kay. Arati's other interests include dancing, reading, and loving intentionally. She currently works as a part time vegetable enthusiast and a full time high school English teacher.
 
Kiana Young is an unapologetically queer, mixed race Chinese-American poet, educator, and activist from Southern California. In 2016 and 2017, they represented CalSLAM at the CUPSI national collegiate poetry slam, helping their team earn 8th and 13th place, respectively. Kiana was a member of the 2016 Queer Emerging Artist Residency cohort with Destiny Arts Center in Oakland, CA. In 2017, Kiana was a finalist for the Write Bloody Poetry Chapbook contest, and was a featured performer and speaker at Syracuse University. She also has three years of experience as a consent and sexual violence prevention educator in the Bay Area. This year, Kiana will be graduating from UC Berkeley with a B.A. in Rhetoric and Public Discourse and a minor in LGBT Studies––which means that they are a scholarly gay and you shouldn’t argue with them. Currently, she works as a speech and debate coach for middle school and high school youth of color in the Bay Area.
 
 
7:30pm to 9:00pm
The Bindery
1727 Haight Street
94117 San Francisco, California
Feb 26 2018

TALK — HOLDING FORGOTTEN READERS CLOSE: Four Black Women Reflect on African-American Literary Community

Black Scholar-Librarians on Elizabeth McHenry’s Forgotten Readers: Recovering the Lost History of African American Literary Societies (Duke University Press, 2002).
 
Olaronke Akinmowo is a Bed-Stuy born visual artist, cultural scholar, yoga teacher, set decorator, and mom. She creates interactive installations, performances, altars, paper works, and collages that center and celebrate Black womanhood. Her art practice is based in an inquiry and an exploration of the deep and beautiful connections between race, culture, and gender.  In 2015 she started The Free Black Women's Library, an interactive roving biblio-installation that holds a collection of 900 books written by Black women. This mobile library travels throughout New York City and pops up monthly in a wide range of public locations and cultural institutions. This social art project also features performances, workshops, readings, film screenings, and critical conversations. Olaronke is working on expanding the library to create a digital app and is also raising money to purchase or build a tiny home or bus that will serve as a physical container/bookmobile for the mobile library which she can then take across the country. Find out more about the library through your favorite social media platform, IG, Tumblr, Facebook or Twitter. 
 
Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves (New York City, 1980) is an artist chiefly concerned with postcolonial ethnobotany working in mediums of scholarship, performance, corporeal wisdom, archival gesture, and language. Greaves has been published in The Black Earth Institute's About Place Journal, The Recluse, The Poetry Project Newsletter, and No, Dear. In 2017 Belladonna* published her first chaplet — Close Reading As Forestry. She lives and works in New York City where she is Monday Night Reading Series Coordinator at the Poetry Project, a Wendy’s Subway board member, and young mother of The Florxal Review
 
Lyric Hunter is a writer from New York City. Her chapbooks include Motherwort (Guillotine, 2017) and Swallower (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2014). Her work has also appeared in Pelt Vol. 4: Feminist Temporalities, The Felt, Poems by Sunday, Belleville Park Pages, and Arava Review.
 
Jhani Miller is an award winning scholar hailing from the University of Illinois School of Information Science.  Her work relates to black femme identity, emotional health, and social influence. When she isn’t advocating for historically marginalized groups in libraries, she’s an aerial performer, lo-fi photographer, and geek culture researcher. You can find her at the Brooklyn Public Library where she is the Library Information Supervisor or reach out to her online on Instagram at Librarian_shimmy.
 
Admission fee: $8.00
8:00pm
The Poetry Project
131 E 10th Street
10003 New York, New York
Feb 28 2018

A reading and Q&A with award-winning poet Javier Zamora

Letras Latinas at University of Notre Dame's Institute for Latino Studies and Duende District Bookstore are pleased to present a reading and Q&A with award-winning poet Javier Zamora

Javier Zamora was born in La Herradura, El Salvador, in 1990, and he migrated to the United States in 1999. He received a BA from the University of California at Berkeley and an MFA from New York University. Zamora is the author of Unaccompanied (Copper Canyon Press, 2017). He has received fellowships from CantoMundo, Colgate University, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Poetry Foundation, among others. A 2016­–2018 Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, he lives in San Rafael, California.

This event is free and open to the public. Link to online RSVP coming soon.

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7:30pm
UC Washington Center
1608 Rhode Island Ave. NW
Multi-purpose room, 1st floor
20036 Washington, District Of Columbia
Feb 28 2018

John Godfrey & Camille Rankine

John Godfrey was born in Massena, N.Y. in 1945. He is the author of 14 collections of poetry, including The City Keeps: Selected and New Poems 1966-2014 (Wave Books, May 2016). He received an A.B. from Princeton University in 1967, and took a B.S. in Nursing from Columbia University in 1994. He has received fellowships from the General Electric Foundation (1984), the Foundation for Contemporary Arts (2009), and the Z Foundation (2013). He retired in 2011 after 17 years as a nurse clinician in HIV/AIDS. He has lived in the East Village of Manhattan since the 1960s.

Camille Rankine is the author of Incorrect Merciful Impulses, published in 2016 by Copper Canyon Press, and the chapbook Slow Dance with Trip Wire, selected by Cornelius Eady for the Poetry Society of America’s 2010 New York Chapbook Fellowship. She is the recipient of a 2010 “Discovery”/Boston Review Poetry Prize, as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the MacDowell Colony. She serves on the Executive Committee for VIDA: Women in Literary Arts, chairs the board of The Poetry Project, and teaches at The New School and Hampshire College.

Admission fee: $8.00
8:00pm
The Poetry Project
131 E 10th Street
10003 New York, New York
Mar 01 2018

#PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week: Lunch Poems with Rosa Alcalá

Join Rosa Alcalá for a noontime poetry reading at the Morrison Library in Doe Library, University of California Berkeley, on March 1, 2018, 12:10 p.m. to 12:50 p.m. 

Born and raised in Paterson, NJ, Rosa Alcalá is the author of three books of poetry, most recently MyOTHER TONGUE. Her poetry also appears in a number of anthologies, including Stephanie Burt’s The Poem is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them. The recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship, her translations are featured in the forthcoming Cecilia Vicuña: New & Selected Poems. Alcalá teaches in the Department of Creative Writing and Bilingual MFA Program at the University of Texas-El Paso.

The Lunch Poems series at University of California Berkeley, founded by Professor Robert Hass, is under the direction of Professor Geoffrey G. O'Brien.
 
Support for this series is provided by Dr. and Mrs. Tom Colby, the Library, The Morrison Library Fund, the dean's office of the College of Letters and Sciences, the English Department, and the Townsend Center for the Humanities. These events are also partially supported by Poets & Writers, Inc. through a grant it has received from The James Irvine Foundation.

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12:00pm
University of California, Berkeley
Doe Library
Morrison Library
94720 Berkeley, California
Mar 01 2018

Carl Phillips on Wild Is the Wind

Black Futures presents a reading, lecture, and conversation, by Carl Phillips and Laylah Ali.

“What has restlessness been for?”

In, Wild Is the Wind, Carl Phillips reflects on love as depicted in the jazz standard for which the book is named—love at once restless, reckless, and yet desired for its potential to bring stability. In the process, he pitches estrangement against communion, examines the past as history versus the past as memory, and reflects on the past’s capacity both to teach and to mislead us—also to make us hesitate in the face of love, given the loss and damage that are, often enough, love’s fallout. How “to say no to despair”? How to take perhaps that greatest risk, the risk of believing in what offers no guarantee? These poems that, in their wedding of the philosophical, meditative, and lyric modes, mark a new stage in Phillips’s remarkable work, stand as further proof that “if Carl Phillips had not come onto the scene, we would have needed to invent him. His idiosyncratic style, his innovative method, and his unique voice are essential steps in the evolution of the craft” (Judith Kitchen, The Georgia Review).

7:30pm
Center for African American Poetry & Poetics
326 S. Bellefield Avenue
Heinz Memorial Chapel
15213 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

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