National Poetry Month

 Academy of American Poets Chancellor Claudia Rankine

national
poetry month April 2018
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about the celebration

about the celebration

National Poetry Month was inaugurated by the Academy of American Poets in 1996. Over the years, it has become the largest literary celebration in the world with schools, publishers, libraries, booksellers, and poets celebrating poetry’s vital place in our culture.

Thank you for joining in the celebration by listing your events and attending other events in your community, displaying this year's poster, participating in Poem in Your Pocket Dayrecommending the Dear Poet project to a young personsigning up to read a Poem-a-Day, and checking out 30 more ways to celebrate.

We hope National Poetry Month's events and activities will inspire you to keep celebrating poetry all year long!

download the national poetry month logo

sponsors & partners 

 

National Poetry Month Sponsor Logos

 

 

get involved

Dear Poet 

A multimedia educational project that invites young people to write letters in response to poems shared by our Chancellors.

learn more

Anne Waldman

Poem in Your Pocket Day

Join thousands of individuals across the U.S. who will carry a poem in their pocket on April 26, 2018. 
 

find a poem

Poem in Your Pocket Day

Poetry & the Creative Mind

The 2018 annual gala will be held at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center in New York City on April 25.
 

read more

Poetry and the Creative Mind

 

upcoming events

date
Jan 19 2018

#PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week: Reasons for Smoking by Xandria Phillips

Come celebrate the release of the new chapbook, Reasons for Smoking, by poet Xandria Phillips on January 19, 2018, 7:30 p.m., at Women & Children First in Chicago, IL. Reasons for Smoking is the winner of the the Seattle Review’s 2016 Chapbook contest, which was judged by Claudia Rankine. Rankine said of Phillips’ work, “The poems in Reasons for Smoking articulate how living, touching, noticing, speaking, and remembering are necessary and subversive acts.” For this event, Xandria will be joined by Chekwube Danladi.
 
Xandria Phillips is a poet who hails from rural Ohio but currently lives in Chicago. Xandria received her BA from Oberlin College, where she studied creative writing and Africana Studies. She has received fellowships from Cave Canem and Callaloo. Xandria’s poetry is present or forthcoming in Callaloo, Transition, Nepantla, and elsewhere.
 
Chekwube O. Danladi was born in Lagos, Nigeria and raised in Washington DC and West Baltimore. Their chapbook, Take Me Back, was recently included as part of the New-Generation African Poets: Nne. They have received support from Callaloo, Kimbilio, the Vermont Studio Center, and Hedgebrook, and their work has been nominated for a Pushcart. They are currently at work on a novel about queers living in Abuja, Nigeria. They live in Urbana, Illinois.
 
 

To be considered for #PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week, we invite you to become a registered user of Poets.org and use our online calendar Poetry Near You to promote local events in your community.

7:30pm
Women & Children First
5233 N. Clark St.
60640 Chicago, Illinois
Jan 19 2018

Maggie Smith at the Piper Writers House

Join the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing for an evening with poet Maggie Smith on Friday, January 19th, 2017 at the Piper Writers House (450 E Tyler Mall, Tempe, AZ 85281) at 7 pm. Smith will be reading from her latest collection Good Bones, whose title piece was named the Official Poem of 2016 by Public Radio International. An informal q&a and book signing will follow the reading. This event is open to the public and free. 
 
About the Book
 
The title poem of Good Bones went viral internationally after the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, and the murder of MP Jo Cox in England. To date the poem has touched more than a million readers and has been translated into nearly a dozen languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, German, Bengali, Korean, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, and Malayalam. It was called the “Official Poem of 2016” by Public Radio International, but the poem has continued to be shared widely around the world in these tumultuous times. In April 2017 “Good Bones” was featured on the CBS primetime drama Madam Secretary—in an episode also called “Good Bones”—and Meryl Streep read the poem at the 2017 Academy of American Poets gala at Lincoln Center. The Telegraph (London) wrote that the poem is “a beautiful elegy for an imperfect world marked by tragedy, exploring the difficulty of finding positivity in the face of suffering…. The poem is a call for us all to improve the world, even if it might just this moment seem beyond repair.” 
 
Good Bones is Maggie Smith’s most intimate and direct book yet. Smith writes out of the experience of motherhood, inspired by watching her own children read the world like a book they’ve just opened, knowing nothing of the characters or plot. These are poems that have a sense of moral gravitas and personal urgency, poems that stare down darkness while cultivating and sustaining possibility. Ada Limón writes, “Truthful, tender, and unafraid of the dark, the poems in Good Bones are lyrically charged love letters to a world in desperate need of her generous eye.”
 
About the Author
 
Maggie Smith is the author of three books of poetry: Good Bones (Tupelo Press, Fall 2017); The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison (Tupelo Press, 2015); and Lamp of the Body (Red Hen Press, 2005). Lamp of the Body won the 2003 Benjamin Saltman Award from Red Hen Press. The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison won the 2012 Dorset Prize, selected by Kimiko Hahn, and the 2016 Gold Medal in Poetry for the Independent Publishers Book Awards.
 
 
7:00pm
Piper Writers House
450 E Tyler Mall
85281 Tempe, Arizona
Jan 19 2018

Basel Abbas + Ruanne Abou-Rahme & Elizabeth A. Povinelli

Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme (b. 1983) work together across a range of sound, image, text, installation and performance practices. Solo exhibitions include the Institute of Contemporary Art (Philadelphia), Office for Contemporary Art (Oslo), Carroll/Fletcher (London), Akademie Der Kuenste Der Welt (Cologne), New Art Exchange (Nottingham), Delfina Foundation (London). Abbas and Abou-Rahme were fellows at Akademie der Kunste der Welt in Cologne in 2013 and artists and recipients of the Sharjah Biennale Prize in 2015. Their publication, And Yet My Mask is Powerful, was recently released from Printed Matter.
 
Elizabeth A. Povinelli is an anthropologist and filmmaker. She is Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University, New York and one of the founding members of the Karrabing Film Collective. Recent publications include Geontologies: A Requiem to Late Liberalism (2016). Povinelli lives and works in New York and Darwin.
 
General Admission: $8
Students/Seniors: $7
Members: $5 or free; no one turned away for inability to pay
 
Admission fee: $8.00
8:00pm
St Mark's Church
131 E 10th Street
10003

recent news and updates

Apr 28 2017
For National Poetry Month, Academy Chancellor Alberto Ríos is collaborating with Arizona State University (ASU) Now photographers Charlie Leight and Deanna Dent to create “visual sonnets." The project, whose name takes inspiration from the number of lines found in a sonnet, features fourteen photographs and poems.
Apr 19 2017
June Jordan
The Center for Black Literature, the Center for Law and Social Justice, and the Brooklyn Public Library are celebrating National Poetry Month with the program “June Jordan: Reflections on Her Life and Activism.” A poet, playwright, and essayist, June Jordan was the author of numerous poetry c

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