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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Caroline Bergvall
Caroline Bergvall
Born in Hamburg, Germany in 1962 to a Norwegian father and French mother, Caroline Bergvall grew up in Switzerland, Norway and France with longer periods in the US and England....
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FURTHER READING
Related Poems
Tender Buttons [A Box]
by Gertrude Stein
Related Prose
Books Noted:
Caroline Bergvall, Meddle English
Other Prose Poems
A Supermarket in California
by Allen Ginsberg
Be Drunk
by Charles Baudelaire
Einstein Defining Special Relativity
by A. Van Jordan
Exoskeletal Gesture
by Eric Baus
Gnosis
by Theodore Worozbyt
Just Listen
by Peter Johnson
Marble Hill
by Kazim Ali
RPT MC-60 00.27 8
by Tan Lin
Seurat
by Ira Sadoff
The List of Famous Hats
by James Tate
The Prose Poem
by Campbell McGrath
The Secret of Light
by James Wright
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About Foam

 
by Caroline Bergvall

A paradoxical pleasure is both solid nor liquid that can be wet, dry, hard, soft, expansive, changeable. An intricate and hollow polymer network is energy transport at its finest, a compound structure of gas nor bubbles nor fans. Once hardened it can be tough to break. What binds. A gel for instance can envelop like an elastic skin. It can be prodded distorted pushed about, yet will bounce back and hold its shape. Under greater surface tension, it breaks into liquid starts to flow. A resilient responsive substance is mysterious, swift to morph, ever present in all that is cellular and delivers a shake-up. It supports the many invisible synthetic demands of industry-dependent living from insulants to binding agents. It has naturally assisted in the solidification of soap, the rising of bread, egg whites, and soufflés since the 17th century. The old ponce pumice stone works on hard callouses. Once exploded it can be hard as ash. The skeletal containers of dead sponges were used by Romans for brushes and combs, and for cups. Proust's memory work is foamic in a foam-lined room. A sudden foaming from the mouth for instance is the warning of miles of a thick sluggish matter heaped along coastlines, or bubbling up, obstructing the flow of vast industrial evacuation conduits. Matter turns unwelcoming, seemingly unregonisable. A persistent reactivity to events in its surroundings acts on a profound imbalance, the sign of a system being worked beyond capacity. Foams everywhere like the letter e, down to the alveolar structure.







Reprinted from Meddle English. Copyright 2011 by Caroline Bergvall. Used with permission of Nightboat Books. All rights reserved.
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