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Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, on February 3, 1874, to...
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FURTHER READING
Related Prose
Groundbreaking Book: Tender Buttons by Gertrude Stein (1914)
The Difference is Spreading: on Gertrude Stein
by Marjorie Perloff
An Anatomy of the Long Poem
by Rachel Zucker
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Tender Buttons [A Chair]

 
by Gertrude Stein

A CHAIR.

A widow in a wise veil and more garments shows that shadows are even. It addresses no more, it shadows the stage and learning. A regular arrangement, the severest and the most preserved is that which has the arrangement not more than always authorised.

A suitable establishment, well housed, practical, patient and staring, a suitable bedding, very suitable and not more particularly than complaining, anything suitable is so necessary.

A fact is that when the direction is just like that, no more, longer, sudden and at the same time not any sofa, the main action is that without a blaming there is no custody.

Practice measurement, practice the sign that means that really means a necessary betrayal, in showing that there is wearing.

Hope, what is a spectacle, a spectacle is the resemblance between the circular side place and nothing else, nothing else.

To choose it is ended, it is actual and more than that it has it certainly has the same treat, and a seat all that is practiced and more easily much more easily ordinarily.

Pick a barn, a whole barn, and bend more slender accents than have ever been necessary, shine in the darkness necessarily. Actually not aching, actually not aching, a stubborn bloom is so artificial and even more than that, it is a spectacle, it is a binding accident, it is animosity and accentuation.

If the chance to dirty diminishing is necessary, if it is why is there no complexion, why is there no rubbing, why is there no special protection.







From Tender Buttons (1914) by Gertrude Stein.
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