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John Milton
John Milton
John Milton was born in London on December 9, 1608, into a...
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FURTHER READING
Poems About Illness
Kaddish, Part I
by Allen Ginsberg
A Litany in Time of Plague
by Thomas Nashe
Afternoon at MacDowell
by Jane Kenyon
Against Elegies
by Marilyn Hacker
Anxieties
by Donna Masini
Auld Lang Syne
by Jennifer L. Knox
Beasts
by Carmen Giménez Smith
Bedside
by William Olsen
Breathing
by Josephine Dickinson
Christmas Away from Home
by Jane Kenyon
Cognitive Deficit Market
by Joshua Corey
Evening
by Gail Mazur
Everyone Gasps with Anxiety
by Jeni Olin
Having it Out with Melancholy
by Jane Kenyon
Her Body Like a Lantern Next to Me
by John Rybicki
Hospital Writing Workshop
by Rafael Campo
In Memory of W. B. Yeats
by W. H. Auden
Losing It
by Margaret Gibson
Mastectomy
by Wanda Coleman
Phases
by Michael Redhill
Prayer for Sleep
by Cheryl Dumesnil
R.I.P., My Love
by Tory Dent
Sick
by Shel Silverstein
The Embrace
by Mark Doty
The Land of Counterpane
by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Nurse
by Michael Blumenthal
The Sick Child
by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Sick Rose
by William Blake
The Subalterns
by Thomas Hardy
The Transparent Man
by Anthony Hecht
The Visit
by Jason Shinder
To Amy Lowell
by Eunice Tietjens
Tubes
by Donald Hall
Units
by Albert Goldbarth
Visits to St. Elizabeths
by Elizabeth Bishop
Waking in the Blue
by Robert Lowell
Related Prose
Poetic Form: Sonnet
Other Sonnets
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A Sonnet from the Archive Of Love's Failures, Volumes 1-3.5 Million
by Anne Boyer
Acquainted with the Night
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American Sonnet (10)
by Wanda Coleman
American Sonnet (35)
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Anthem for Doomed Youth
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Atlantis—A Lost Sonnet
by Eavan Boland
Autumn
by Richard Garcia
Chopin
by Emma Lazarus
Composed Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802
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Death, be not proud (Holy Sonnet 10)
by John Donne
Discourse
by Forrest Hamer
Echoes
by Emma Lazarus
Gapped Sonnet
by Suzanne Gardinier
God's Grandeur
by Gerard Manley Hopkins, read by Karen Volkman
Half-Hearted Sonnet
by Kim Addonizio
History
by Robert Lowell
How Do I Love Thee? (Sonnet 43)
by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
I shall forget you presently, my dear (Sonnet XI)
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
I think I should have loved you presently (Sonnet IX)
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
Love is Not All (Sonnet XXX)
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
Love Song for Love Songs
by Rafael Campo
Mother Night
by James Weldon Johnson
My Letters! all dead paper... (Sonnet 28)
by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130)
by William Shakespeare
November
by William Cullen Bryant
Oil & Steel
by Henri Cole
Sappho and Phaon: Sonnet III
by Mary Robinson
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? (Sonnet 18)
by William Shakespeare
Shawl
by Albert Goldbarth
Silence
by Thomas Hood
Sonnet
by Alice Dunbar-Nelson
Sonnet 1
by Gwendolyn Bennett
Sonnet 100
by Lord Brooke Fulke Greville
Sonnet 101 [Ways apt and new to sing of love I'd find]
by Petrarch
Sonnet 131 [I'd sing of Love in such a novel fashion]
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Sonnet 6
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Sonnet 8 [Set me where as the sun doth parch the green]
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Sonnet V
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Sonnet [Nothing was ever what it claimed to be,]
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Sonnet—Silence
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Testing Gardening
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The Clouded Morning
by Jones Very
Today We Make the Poet's Words Our Own
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Without Discussion
by Samuel Amadon
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When I Consider How My Light Is Spent

 
by John Milton

When I consider how my light is spent,
   Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
   And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodged with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
   My true account, lest He returning chide;
   "Doth God exact day-labor, light denied?"
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies, "God doth not need
   Either man's work or His own gifts. Who best
   Bear His mild yoke, they serve Him best. His state
Is kingly: thousands at His bidding speed,
   And post o'er land and ocean without rest;
   They also serve who only stand and wait."









About "Sonnet XIX"

Composed sometime between 1652 and 1655, John Milton's "Sonnet 19 [When I consider how my light is spent]" grapples with the subject of the poet's blindness later in life, as well as his changing relationship with God. Many of Milton's best-known poems, including the epic work Paradise Lost, were composed through dictation, transcribed by others, including the poet's daughters and the English metaphysical poet Andrew Marvell.
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