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About this Poem 

According to biographer Joseph Hone, Yeats once commented during a lecture that his poem, "The Cap and Bells," is "the way to win a lady," while "Aedh wishes for the Cloths of Heaven" is the way to lose one.

Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven

W. B. Yeats, 1865 - 1939

Had I the heavens' embroidered cloths,   
Enwrought with golden and silver light,   
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths   
Of night and light and the half light,   
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;   
I have spread my dreams under your feet;   
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

This poem is in the public domain.

This poem is in the public domain.

W. B. Yeats

W. B. Yeats

The work of William Butler Yeats, born in 1865, was greatly influenced by the heritage and politics of Ireland.

by this poet

poem

Never give all the heart, for love
Will hardly seem worth thinking of
To passionate women if it seem
Certain, and they never dream
That it fades out from kiss to kiss;
For everything that's lovely is
But a brief, dreamy, kind delight.
O never give the heart outright,
For they

poem
O what to me the little room   
That was brimmed up with prayer and rest;   
He bade me out into the gloom,   
And my breast lies upon his breast.   
   
O what to me my mother's care,
The house where I was safe and warm;   
The shadowy blossom of my hair   
Will hide us from the bitter storm.   
   
O hiding
poem

Now as at all times I can see in the mind's eye,
In their stiff, painted clothes, the pale unsatisfied ones
Appear and disappear in the blue depth of the sky
With all their ancient faces like rain-beaten stones,
And all their helms of silver hovering side by side,
And all their eyes still