Pennsylvania

upcoming events

date
Mar 13 2018
A Poetry Reading by Michael Palmer

Poet and translator Michael Palmer has lived in San Francisco since 1969. He has worked with the Margaret Jenkins Dance Company for over forty years and has collaborated with many composers and visual artists. His most recent collections are Active Boundaries, Madman With Broom. His new book of poems, The Laughter of the Sphinx was published by New Directions in June of 2016. He has taught at various universities in the United States, Europe and Asia, and in May of 2012 received the Arts and Letters Prize in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Previously, among other awards, he received the Shelley Memorial Prize from the Poetry Society of America, a Lila Wallace Readers Digest Foundation Grant for the years 1992-94, the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets, two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. From 1999 to 2004 he was a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. His work has been translated into over thirty languages, and he himself has translated poems and prose, principally from French, Brazilian Portuguese and Russian.

6:00pm
3805 Locust Walk
19104 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Mar 01 2018
Carl Phillips on Wild Is the Wind

Black Futures presents a reading, lecture, and conversation, by Carl Phillips and Laylah Ali.

“What has restlessness been for?”

In, Wild Is the Wind, Carl Phillips reflects on love as depicted in the jazz standard for which the book is named—love at once restless, reckless, and yet desired for its potential to bring stability. In the process, he pitches estrangement against communion, examines the past as history versus the past as memory, and reflects on the past’s capacity both to teach and to mislead us—also to make us hesitate in the face of love, given the loss and damage that are, often enough, love’s fallout. How “to say no to despair”? How to take perhaps that greatest risk, the risk of believing in what offers no guarantee? These poems that, in their wedding of the philosophical, meditative, and lyric modes, mark a new stage in Phillips’s remarkable work, stand as further proof that “if Carl Phillips had not come onto the scene, we would have needed to invent him. His idiosyncratic style, his innovative method, and his unique voice are essential steps in the evolution of the craft” (Judith Kitchen, The Georgia Review).

7:30pm
326 S. Bellefield Avenue
Heinz Memorial Chapel
15213 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Mar 19 2018
Saint Vincent College Visiting Writers Series: Paula Bohince

Paula Bohince is the author of three poetry collections, most recently Swallows and Waves (Sarabande, 2016). Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Poetry, Granta, and elsewhere. Honors for her work include the Amy Lowell Poetry Travelling Scholarship, an NEA Fellowship in Poetry, and the “Discovery”/The Nation Award. She lives in Pennsylvania.

Since its inception in 2008, the Saint Vincent College Visiting Writers Series has brought writers of merit to our campus in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. In addition to poets hailing from across the country, the series targets international writers in translation as well as writers from Western Pennsylvania.

Free and open to the public.

learn more

5:00pm
300 Fraser Purchase Road
Luparello Lecture Hall
15650-2690 Latrobe, Pennsylvania

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poems

poem
In all these rotten shops, in all this broken furniture
and wrinkled ties and baseball trophies and coffee pots
I have never seen a post-war Philco 
with the automatic eye
nor heard Ravel's "Bolero" the way I did
in 1945 in that tiny living room
on Beechwood Boulevard, nor danced as I did
then, my knives all
poem

I burn your Highland Park. I acid your Carnegie
car dealerships. Your Squirrel Hill, sheer terror
in winter. But most of all, I hate your Liberty Avenue,
the last place, one night, I saw my closest friend
saying, Wait here, outside the after-hours club. I wait,
hating your Strip,

poem

            Steamtown National Historic Site was created in 1986 to
            preserve the history of steam railroading in America,
            concentrating on the era 1850 through 1950.

We weren’t supposed to, so we did
      what any band of boys would do
& we did it the

2