New York

Continuing his support of New York's rich literary tradition, in January 2016 Governor Cuomo appointed Yusef Komunyakaa as New York's 11th state poet, taking over for Marie Howe. Throughout his two-year term, the poet laureate promotes and encourages poetry writing throughout New York by giving public readings and talks within the state.

In 2016 Rebecca Black was appointed the poet laureate of Albany, New York. Black is the author of Cottonlandia (University of Massachusetts Press, 2005), winner of the Juniper Prize for Poetry.

upcoming events

date
Sep 26 2017
Poets on Craft: Remica Bingham-Risher and Monica Youn

Join us for an exciting evening of poetry and conversation between poets Remica Bingham-Risher and Monica Youn. Bingham-Risher is the author of Conversion, winner of the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award and What We Ask of Flesh, which Lucille Clifton said “…sees with a brave eye and hears the music of all our languages, validating each.” Youn is the author of BLACKACRE, which won the William Carlos Williams Award of the Poetry Society of America and was described by the Chicago Tribune as “gorgeous and intellectually scintillating.” Fellow Brian Francis moderates. Free and open to the public. Refreshments served. Co-sponsored by The New School Creative Writing Program.

Remica Bingham-Risher, a native of Phoenix, Arizona, is a Cave Canem fellow and Affrilachian Poet. Among other journals, her work has been published in The Writer’s ChronicleNew LettersCallaloo and Essence. She is the author of Conversion (Lotus, 2006) winner of the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award, What We Ask of Flesh (Etruscan, 2013) shortlisted for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and Starlight & Error (Diode, 2017) winner of the Diode Editions Book Award. She is the Director of Quality Enhancement Plan Initiatives at Old Dominion University. She resides in Norfolk, VA with her husband and children.

Monica Youn is the author of BLACKACRE (2016), which was awarded the William Carlos Williams Award of the Poetry Society of America (judged by Robin Coste Lewis). It was also a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the PEN Open Book Award and longlisted for the National Book Award, as well as being named one of the best poetry collections of the year by the New York Times, the Washington Post and BuzzFeed. Her previous book IGNATZ (2010) was a finalist for the National Book Award. The daughter of Korean immigrants and a former lawyer, she teaches at Princeton University and in the M.F.A. Programs at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University.

6:30pm to 8:30pm
55 W. 13th St,
2nd Floor
10011 New York, New York
Nov 13 2017
A Celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks

The 92nd Street Y Unterberg Poetry Center hosts an evening of readings to celebrate the centenary of Gwendolyn Brooks—part of a year-long, nationwide tribute to one of America’s most influential poets. This event will feature presentations by Elizabeth Alexander, Tyehimba Jess, Yusef Komunyakaa, Quraysh Ali Lansana, Marilyn Nelson, Atsuro Riley, Sapphire, Solmaz Sharif, and Patricia Smith.

Co-sponsored by Our Miss Brooks: A Centennial Celebration, the Academy of American Poets, the NYU Creative Writing Program, the Poetry Society of America, Poets House and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (NYPL).

 

7:30pm to 9:30pm
1395 Lexington Ave
10128 New York, New York
Sep 22 2017
Exile and Exaltation: A Brief Look at 100 Years of the Shared History Between Filipinos and Black Folks: A Lecture by Patrick Rosal

As if the Black imagination had hit a low point between Reconstruction and the Great Migration, the period between 1890 and 1920 has been called “the nadir” of African American history. But what if this era of Black culture was left out of history in order to preserve the American fantasy of imperialism and expansionism? What if, as a result of the distortion of the story of the Philippine-American War (c.1898-), Filipino and Filipino American history was lost along with its Black counterparts as well as crucial instances in which Black folks and Filipinos engaged in correspondence, mutual seeing, and the kinds of collaboration that threaten the white supremacist myths of the state? And how do we see each other in the 21st century? Are we now complicit in the forgetting?

In this talk, Patrick Rosal will discuss figures of the twentieth century like W.E.B. Dubois, Carter G. Woodson, Thomas Edison, and soldier-composer-conductor Walter H. Loving. Lecture material will be drawn from a prose book-in-progress about his mother’s arrival in America during the Civil Rights Era.

The son of Ilokano immigrants and former b-boy and DJ, Patrick Rosal is the author of four books of poetry, most recently Brooklyn Antediluvian which was a finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award. He has a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright Senior Research Fellowship, a Lannan residency, and the Association of Asian American Studies Book Award. His poems have appeared in PoetryAmerican Poetry ReviewNew England Review, and the Best American Poetry. He directs the MFA program at Rutgers University-Camden where he is an Associate Professor of Creative Writing.

 

6:30pm to 8:00pm
20 Jay Street
Suite 310-A
11201 Brooklyn, New York

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Festival New York Poetry Festival New York
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Landmark Cornelia Street Café New York
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Poetry in New York
Yusef Komunyakaa
New York poet laureate

Yusef Komunyakaa

Poet Yusef Komunyakaa first received wide recognition following the 1984 publication of Copacetic, a collection of poems built from colloquial speech...

poems

poem
Droning a drowsy syncopated tune,
Rocking back and forth to a mellow croon,
     I heard a Negro play.
Down on Lenox Avenue the other night
By the pale dull pallor of an old gas light
     He did a lazy sway . . .
     He did a lazy sway . . .
To the tune o' those Weary Blues.
With his ebony hands on each ivory
poem

To Mary Jo Salter

Beyond the ice-bound stones and bucking trees, 
past bewildered Mary, the Meer in snow, 
two skating rinks and two black crooked paths

are a battered pair of reading glasses 
scratched by the skater's multiplying math. 
Beset, I play this game of tic-tac-toe.

Divide, subtract. Who can
poem
The instructor said,

    Go home and write
    a page tonight.
    And let that page come out of you—
    Then, it will be true.

I wonder if it's that simple?
I am twenty-two, colored, born in Winston-Salem.
I went to school there, then Durham, then here
to this college on the hill