Massachusetts

In the fall of 2014, Danielle Legros Georges was chosen as the second poet laureate of Boston, Massachusetts. The author of The Dear Remote Nearness of You (Barrow Street Press, 2016) and Maroon (Curbstone Books, 2001), she is a professor at Lesley University.

In March 2015, Patrick Donnelly was named the seventh poet laureate of Northampton, Massachusetts. Donnelly, who is a poet, translator, editor, and teacher, is also director of The Frost Place’s Poetry Seminar. He is the author of Nocturnes of the Brothel of Ruin (Four Way Books, 2012) and The Charge (Ausable Press, 2003). He will serve a two-year term.

In March 2015, Jan Schreiber was named the second poet laureate of Brookline, Massachusetts, taking over for Judith Steinbergh. He will serve a two-year term.

 

upcoming events

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Aug 21 2018
A Reading and Artist Talk by Nick Flynn, Stephen Mitchell, & Paul Stopforth
Nick Flynn is the author of nine books, including the memoirs, The Reenactments, The Ticking is the Bomb: A Memoir of Bewilderment, and Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, and the poetry collections My Feelings, The Captain Asks for a Show of Hands, and Some Ether. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, the Paris Review, and National Public Radio’s This American Life. He has received awards from the Guggenheim Foundation, PEN, the Library of Congress, and was a Fellow at The Fine Arts Work Center. He is currently a professor on the creative writing faculty at the University of Houston. 
 
Stephen Elliott is the author of eight books including the memoir, The Adderall Diaries, the novel Happy Baby, and the essay collection, Sometimes I Think About It. He has directed three movies including About Cherry, which premiered at the Berlinale and was released by IFC, and After Adderall, which was the closing night film for the Slamdance Film Festival. Most recently he is working on the web series Driven
 
Early in his career Paul Stopforth created several bodies of work that were startling in their courageous engagement with the repressive society in which he lived. His uncompromising refusal to turn away from a world of pain and injustice cost him dearly, but earned him enormous respect from his peers and from discerning art critics who saw his work in its first, youthful incarnations at The Market Theatre Gallery, where he was a director from 1977 to 1984. Invited to be Artist-in-Residence at Tufts University Stopforth left South Africa for the United States in the late 1980s, despairing that there would ever be change in his country. He took up a teaching position at Harvard University and taught drawing while on the faculty of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. He recently retired to paint on a full-time basis. Stopforth has exhibited his work since 1971 in galleries and museums in South Africa, the United States and Europe. He has served as curator and juror for a number of institutions and competitions, and in 2004 he delivered the Ruth First Memorial Lecture at Brandeis University. His work is held in many public and private collections in South Africa and abroad. He is represented by The Schoolhouse Gallery in Provincetown.
 
 
6:00pm
24 Pearl St
02657 Provincetown, Massachusetts

recent & featured listings

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Festival Massachusetts Poetry Festival Massachusetts
Writing Program Boston University Massachusetts
Writing Program Emerson College Massachusetts
Writing Program The Solstice MFA in Creative Writing Massachusetts
Writing Program University of Massachusetts: Amherst Massachusetts
Writing Program University of Massachusetts: Boston Massachusetts
Landmark Emily Dickinson’s Home Massachusetts
Landmark The Longfellow House Massachusetts
Landmark Stanley Kunitz’s Home Massachusetts
Landmark The George Edward Woodberry Poetry Room Massachusetts

poems

poem
In Worcester, Massachusetts,
I went with Aunt Consuelo
to keep her dentist's appointment
and sat and waited for her
in the dentist's waiting room.
It was winter. It got dark
early. The waiting room
was full of grown-up people,
arctics and overcoats,
lamps and magazines.
My aunt was inside
what seemed like a long
poem
The readers of the Boston Evening Transcript	
Sway in the wind like a field of ripe corn.	
 
When evening quickens faintly in the street,	
Wakening the appetites of life in some	
And to others bringing the Boston Evening Transcript,
I mount the steps and ring the bell, turning	
Wearily, as one
poem

We draw breath from brick
          step on stones, weather-worn,
                    cobbled and carved  

with the story of this church,
          this meeting house,
                    where Ben Franklin was baptized

and Phillis Wheatley prayed—a mouth-house
          where