California

On December 4, 2015, California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. appointed Dana Gioia as California poet laureate. He is the author of numerous poetry collections and books of literary criticism. He will serve a two-year term.

Alejandro Murguía is San Francisco’s sixth poet laureate and the first Latino poet to hold the position. An editor, translator, literary organizer, and prose writer, he is the author of the poetry collections Stray Poems (City Lights Books, 2014) and Native Tongue (CC. Marimbo Press, 2012), among others.

upcoming events

date
Jul 01 2018
The Inborn Word: Move Write & Read
THE INBORN WORD: MOVE | WRITE | READ with PEGGY DOBREER is a workshop for writers with an emphasis on prodding the body and brain to collaborate more deliberately. Each workshop includes easy movement, a packet of prompts and poems, and time for personal feedback. Revitalize your writing by increasing your range of motion in the body and on the page.
 
“Until I Took Peggy Dobreer’s Workshop At AROHO, I Never Dreamed That Movement Could Open Such Rich Avenues of Play And Invention In My Writing Process. Dobreer’s Approach Is Magical.” —Janet Fitch, Author Of White Oleander, The Revolution Of Marina M.
 
Please wear loose fitting clothes for movement. Bare feet or clean socks are best for this first half hour. The bulk of our time is spent on writing, reading, and peer discussion. Packet of poems and prompts are provided.
 
Peggy Dobreer is a long-time performance artist and late-career poet, winner of the 2017 Poetry Matters Poetry Prize from Downey Symphony Orchestra. She has a 2014 Pushcart Nomination, two collections titled, Drop and Dazzle and In The Lake of Your Bones, both from MoonTide Press, and two earlier (self-published) titles, Little Captures and Face of Sky, First Eye Press.
 
Peggy is a choreographer, parent, student of mystical traditions, and an irrepressible curator of new combinations. Ms. Dobreer’s poetry is lyrical, mobile, and published most noteably in Pirene’s Fountain, Mas Tequilla Review, Malpais Review, Bicycle Review, San Pedro River Review, and Yoga Magazine. Most recent anthologies include: the just released, Voices From Leimert Park Redux Anthology, Harriet Tubman Press for Tsehai Publishers, Vol. #1, Aeolian Harp Folio Series, Glass Lyre Press, Like A Girl: Perspectives on Feminine Identity, Lucid Moose Lit, and Ekphrastia Gone Wild, which also features work by Nobel Laureate, Wislawa Szymborska.
 
Peggy is co-author of 64 Ways to Practice Nonviolence: A Curriculum and Resource Guide, Pro-Ed, Inc. She facilitates E=Mc2BODIED POETRY WORKSHOPS for adults, teaches for Writers In The Schools at Red Hen Press, and hosts THE RwIrGiHtTe READ literay series at Stories Books. She was a Program Director at AROHO2015, at Ghost Ranch.
 
 

 

4:00pm
1540 Lincoln Ave.
91103 Pasadena, California
Jun 30 2018
Humor is Serious Business: The Use and Abuse of Humor in Poetry

In this class, we’ll examine poems that make effective use of humor, and do some writing to help you free your inner Monty Python.  To help in the process, please bring (# of class members) copies of a poem not your own that strikes you as seriously funny.  In the afternoon, we’ll discuss a poem of yours—preferably one that either uses humor, or that you think could use more of it.  Please bring copies of your poem for this workshop.

Instructors

Charles Harper Webb, called by Lifescape “Southern California’s most inventive and accessible poet,” has published twelve books of poetry, including Reading the Water, Liver, Tulip Farms & Leper Colonies, Hot Popsicles, Amplified Dog, Shadow Ball: New and Selected Poems, What Things Are Made Of, Brain Camp, and his most recent, Sidebend World, forthcoming from the University of Pittsburgh Press in 2018. A Million MFAs Are Not Enough, a collection of Webb’s essays on the craft of poetry, was published by Red Hen Press in 2016.  Webb’s awards in poetry include the Morse Prize, the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, the Felix Pollock Prize, and the Benjamin Saltman Prize.  His poems have appeared in distinguished journals and anthologies, including American Poetry Review, Paris Review, Iowa Review, Yale Review, Harvard Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, The Georgia Review, Tin House, Poets of the New Century, Best American Poetry, and The Pushcart Prize. A former professional rock musician and psychotherapist, he is the editor of Stand Up Poetry: An Expanded Anthology, and recipient of a Whiting Writer’s Award, a fellowship from the Guggenheim foundation, and the CSULB Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award. He is Professor of English at California State University, Long Beach, in the MFA Program in Creative Writing.

A prolific writer, Ron Koertge was published widely in the ’60s and ’70s in such seminal magazines as Kayak and Poetry Now. His first book, The Father Poems, was published in 1973, and was soon followed by many more, including poetry, prose, novels-in-verse, and fiction for teenagers. His most recent book, Vampire Planet, was released in 2016 from Red Hen Press. Ron is the recipient of grants from the N.E.A. and the California Arts Council, has poems in two volumes of Best American Poetry (1999 and 2005), and is a 2017 Pushcart Prize winner.  His fiction has been honored by the American Library Association, and two novels have received PEN awards. After teaching for thirty-seven years at the city college in Pasadena, he retired and now teaches at Hamline University in their low-residency MFA program for Children’s Writing. He currently lives in South Pasadena, California, with his wife, Bianca Richards.

sign up

1:00pm
1540 Lincoln Ave.
91103 Pasadena, California
Poetry in California
Dana Gioia
California poet laureate

Dana Gioia

Born in Hawthorne, California, in 1950, Dana Gioia is the author of several poetry collections, including Interrogations at Noon (Graywolf Press,...

poems

poem
What are you thinking about?

I am thinking of an early summer.
I am thinking of wet hills in the rain
Pouring water.  Shedding it
Down empty acres of oak and manzanita
Down to the old green brush tangled in the sun,
Greasewood, sage, and spring mustard.
Or the hot wind coming down from Santa Ana
Driving
poem

i.

    —& humans walked to the edge of the sand
  through a bank of verbena & fog;  
     they thought they’d never get over
the deaths, but they were starting to. Worry
     about money rested in their phones. Talk of
 candidates had stalled. Some sang. Grays of