Lines of Protest

Posted on

Mar 22 2018

For the students and others joining them in support at this week’s March for Our Lives, we offer a selection of lines of poetry perfect for posters, banners, or placards.


You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.


Maya Angelou, from “Still I Rise

*

we are the ones we have been waiting for

June Jordan, from “Poem for South African Women

*

All I have is a voice
To undo the folded lie

W. H. Auden, from “September 1, 1939

*

Hold fast to dreams.

Langston Hughes, from “Dreams

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I know. But I do not approve. And I am not resigned.

Edna St. Vincent Millay, from “Dirge Without Music

*

Surely some revelation is at hand

W. B. Yeats, from “The Second Coming

*

And naught may daunt her,—she hath strength for all.

Emma Lazarus, from “Work

*

I am a flint and a fire,

I am an answer

Sara Teasdale, from “What Do I Care?

*

I want my free will and want it accompanying

the path which leads to action

Rainer Maria Rilke, from “I Am Much Too Alone in This World, Yet Not Alone

*

This place could be beautiful,
right? You could make this place beautiful.

Maggie Smith, from “Good Bones

*

None of this fits into my notion of “things going very well”

June Jordan, from “The Bombing of Baghdad

*

My heart cannot confront
this death without relief
My soul will not control
this leaking of my grief

June Jordan, from “The Bombing of Baghdad

*

And here is my song of the living
who must sing against the dying

June Jordan, from “The Bombing of Baghdad

*

Children will go to school

and come home again.

Dunya Mikhail, from “The Iraqi Nights

*

The few who dare, must speak and speak again
To right the wrongs of many.

Ella Wheeler Wilcox , from “Protest
 

*

Can we agree Kevlar
backpacks shouldn’t be needed
for children walking to school?

Matthew Olzmann, from “Letter Beginning with Two Lines by Czesław Miłosz

*

The classroom of grief
had far more seats
than the classroom for math

Matthew Olzmann, from “Letter Beginning with Two Lines by Czesław Miłosz