poetry near you

Are you looking to connect with poets or find opportunities to hear or study poetry? To find poetry events and resources near you, simply enter your zip code in the search field below. You can also click on the states menu to the right above and select your state to find festivals, conferences, writing programs, literary organizations, landmarks, poetry-friendly bookstores, and more in your area. If you'd like to share events with the Poets.org audience, please submit them below.

upcoming events

filter by
date
Nov 25 2017

#PoetryNear You Pick of the Week: Segue Reading Series presents Peggy Robles-Alvarado + Paul Tran

Join poets Peggy Robles-Alvarado and Paul Tran as they read from their work at Zinc Bar, 82nd W 3rd St, New York, NY 10012, on November 15, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
 
Peggy Robles-Alvarado is a two-time International Latino Book Award winner & an MFA candidate at Pratt Institute. She authored Conversations With My Skin, Homenaje A Las Guerreras, & The Abuela Stories Project. She edited the anthology, Mujeres, The Magic, The Movement, and The Muse. Contact her at robleswrites.com.
 
Paul Tran is Poetry Editor at The Offing & Chancellor’s Graduate Fellow in the Writing Program at Washington University in St. Louis. Their work appears in The New Yorker, Prairie Schooner, MTV, & elsewhere.
 
$5 admission goes to support the readers. The Segue Reading Series is made possible, in part, by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and by the support of The Segue Foundation. For more information, please visit www.seguefoundation.com or call (212) 614-0505. 
 

To be considered for #PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week, we invite you to become a registered user of Poets.org and use our online calendar Poetry Near You to promote local events in your community.

Admission fee: $5.00
4:30pm
Zinc Bar
82 W 3rd St (bet. Thompson & Sullivan Sts.)
10012 New York, New York
Dec 01 2017

#PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week: Sandra Cisneros, Rita Dove, and Joy Harjo

Three literary legends come together on December 1, 2017, 7 p.m., at the Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N Central Ave, Phoenix, AZ, to read from their own writing, as well as to discuss and celebrate the respective and collective impacts of their work over the years. This event is presented in partnership with ArchiTEXTS: A Conversation Across Languages with Natalie Diaz. 
 
Seating for this event in Whiteman Hall is now SOLD OUT.  There may be limited additional seating in Whiteman Hall on the night of the event on a first come, first served basis, to be released 5 minutes before the event starts. Additionally, 200 overflow seats and a live feed video system will be set up in the Great Hall adjacent to Whiteman Hall for those without seats in the auditorium. 
 
Readings in Phoenix are presented in collaboration with the Phoenix Art Museum and with support from lead sponsor the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing, with additional support from the ASU Creative Writing Program, the Literary & Prologue Society, and Superstition Review. 
 
 

Sandra Cisneros is a poet, short story writer, novelist, essayist, and an activist. Writing for over 50 years, her work explores the lives of the working-class. Her numerous awards include NEA fellowships in both poetry and prose, the Texas Medal of the Arts, a MacArthur Fellowship, several honorary degrees, national and international book awards, and most recently Chicago's Fifth Star Award, the PEN Center USA Literary Award and the National Medal of Arts presented to her by President Obama at the White House. Her classic coming-of-age novel, The House on Mango Street has sold over six million copies, has been translated into more than twenty languages, and is required reading in elementary, high school, and university curricula across the U.S. Founder of awards and foundations that serve writers and a dual citizen of the United States and Mexico, Sandra Cisneros earns her living by her pen. 

Former U.S. poet laureate Rita Dove was born in Akron, Ohio in 1952. A 1970 Presidential Scholar as one of the one hundred top high school graduates in the nation that year, she received her MFA in 1977 from the University of Iowa's Writers Workshop, where she was the only African American student at the time. From 1981 to 1989 she taught creative writing at Arizona State University - the final two years as the first and only African-American full professor in ASU's English Department. 
 
In 1989 Rita Dove joined the University of Virginia, where she continues to hold the chair of Commonwealth Professor of English. The recipient of the 1987 Pulitzer Prize in poetry for Thomas and Beulah, a book she wrote while teaching at ASU, she has numerous other literary works to her credit, among them Sonata Mulattica (2009), a poetic treatise on the life of 19th century violinist George Bridgetower, as well as sole editorship of The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry (2011). Her drama The Darker Face of the Earth premiered at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in 1996, followed by productions at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., the Royal National Theatre in London and many other venues. The Boston Symphony debuted her song cycle "Seven for Luck," with music by John Williams, under the composer's baton in 1998.
 
Rita Dove's most recent book, Collected Poems 1974-2004, received the 2017 NAACP Image Award and was a finalist for the 2016 National Book Award. Among her many other honors are the 2011 National Medal of Arts from President Obama, the 1996 National Humanities Medal from President Clinton (making her the only poet with both national medals) and 25 honorary degrees, including an honorary Doctor of Letters from Arizona State University in 1995. 
 
Joy Harjo’s eight books of poetry include Conflict Resolution for Holy BeingsHow We Became Human: New and Selected Poems, and She Had Some Horses. Harjo’s memoir Crazy Brave won several awards, including the PEN USA Literary Award for Creative Non-Fiction and the American Book Award. She is the recipient of the 2015 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets for proven mastery in the art of poetry; a Guggenheim Fellowship, the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the United States Artist Fellowship. In 2014 she was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. A renowned musician, Harjo performs with her saxophone nationally and internationally, solo and with her band, the Arrow Dynamics. She has five award-winning CDs of music including the award-winning album Red DreamsA Trail Beyond Tears and Winding Through the Milky Way, which won a Native American Music Award for Best Female Artist of the Year in 2009. She is Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
 

To be considered for #PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week, we invite you to become a registered user of Poets.org and use our online calendar Poetry Near You to promote local events in your community.

 

7:00pm
Phoenix Art Museum
1625 N. Central Ave
85004-1685 Phoenix, Arizona
Nov 26 2017

Page Meets Stage with Jennifer Michael Hecht & Brendan Constantine

The series, often called “where the Pulitzer Prize meets the poetry slam,” is like no other poetry reading series anywhere. Each month, for over 10 years, two different poets, one who writes primarily for the page and another who is more performance oriented, take the stage together and read back and forth, poem for poem. It is not a slam or competition in any way.
 
Check out YouTube to see some of the more memorable moments in the series, or go to PageMeetsStage.com for the complete schedule. Call 646-543-5232 for more information. Tickets are $12 (but discounted if purchased online and early online.
 
Admission fee: $12.00
6:00pm
Bowery Poetry Club
308 Bowery
10012 New York, New York
Nov 27 2017

KGB: Monday Night Poetry - Shane McCrae + Rachel Zucker + Christine Gosnay

Shane McCrae is the author of five books of poetry: In the Language of My Captor (Wesleyan University Press, 2017), which was short-listed for the National Book Award; The Animal Too Big to Kill (Persea Books, 2015), winner of the 2014 Lexi Rudnitsky/Editor’s Choice Award; Forgiveness Forgiveness (Factory Hollow Press, 2014); Blood (Noemi Press, 2013); and Mule (Cleveland State University Poetry Center, 2011). He is the recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. He teaches at Columbia University.
 
Rachel Zucker is the author of nine books, most recently, a memoir, MOTHERs, and a double collection of prose and poetry, The Pedestrians. Her book Museum of Accidents was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. She received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 2013. Zucker teaches poetry at New York University and is currently delivering a series of lectures on the intersection of poetry, confession, ethics and disobedience as part of the Bagley Wright Lecture Series.
 
Christine Gosnay is the founding editor of The Cossack Review. Her first book of poetry, Even Years, won the Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize and will be published in 2017 by Kent State University Press. Her work has been selected for publication in POETRY, Redivider, The Missouri Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, Third Coast, The Collagist, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Sixth Finch, Sugar House Review, The Rumpus, and other magazines.
 
7:00pm
KGB Bar
85 East 4th Street
10003 New York, New York
Nov 27 2017

Rami Karim & Ladan Osman

Rami Karim is a writer and artist based in Brooklyn. Their work has appeared or is forthcoming in Apogee, The Brooklyn Review, The Invisible Bear, and Peregrine, and their chapbook is Smile & Nod (Kaf/Wendy’s Subway, 2017). They teach writing at the City University of New York and are a 2017 Margins Fellow at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop.

Ladan Osman was born in Somalia. She earned a BA at Otterbein College and an MFA at the University of Texas at Austin’s Michener Center for Writers. Her chapbook, Ordinary Heaven, appears in Seven New Generation African Poets (Slapering Hol Press, 2014). Her full-length collection The Kitchen-Dweller’s Testimony (University of Nebraska Press, 2015) won the Sillerman First Book Prize. Her work has appeared in Apogee, The Normal School, Prairie Schooner, Transition Magazine, and Waxwing. Osman has received fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, Cave Canem, and the Michener Center. She is a contributing editor at The Offing and lives in Chicago.

General Admission: $8
Students/Seniors: $7
Members: $5 or free; no one turned away for inability to pay

Admission fee: $8.00
8:00pm
St Mark's Church
St. Mark's Church
10003 New York, New York

recent & featured listings

filter by
type name state
Literary Magazine

The Cincinnati Review

Ohio
Literary Magazine

The Southern Review

Louisiana

poems

poem
For Albert Goldbarth & Margarita Robles


Are you going to steal lines collect
manual typewriters 8 miles high the serotonin Albert
Goldbarth mentions the sugary night the howling
speeding most of all are you going to hobble here—
poem

The quick sparks on the gorse bushes are leaping,
Little jets of sunlight-texture imitating flame;
Above them, exultant, the pee-wits are sweeping:
They are lords of the desolate wastes of sadness their screamings proclaim.

Rabbits, handfuls of brown earth, lie

poem
The obvious is difficult
To prove. Many prefer
The hidden. I did, too.
I listened to the trees.

They had a secret
Which they were about to
Make known to me—
And then didn't.

Summer came. Each tree
On my street had its own
Scheherazade. My nights
Were a part of their wild

Storytelling. We were
Entering dark