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Feb 24 2018

#PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week: NASTY WOMEN Poets! A Book Reading & Signing

Join us for a Book Reading & Signing by NASTY WOMEN POETS to celebrate the release of NASTY WOMEN POETS: An Unapologetic Anthology of Subversive Verse, edited by Grace Bower and Julie Kane, on Saturday, February 24, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., at Beyond Baroque in Venice, CA. 
 
Featured poets include Andi Boyd, Hélène Cardona, Alexis Rhone Fancher, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Ronna Magy, Lisa Mecham, Melinda Palacio, and Lynne Thompson.
 
NASTY WOMEN POETS (Lost Horse Press, 2017) speaks not just to the current political climate and the man who is responsible for its title, but to the stereotypes and expectations women have faced dating back to Eve, and to the long history of women resisting those limitations. The nasty women poets included here talk back to the men who created those limitations, honor foremothers who offered models of resistance and survival, rewrite myths, celebrate their own sexuality and bodies, and the girlhoods they survived. They sing, swear, swagger, and celebrate, and stake claim to life and art on their own terms.
 
The anthology includes work from Kim Addonizio, Jan Beatty, Kelly Cherry, Annie Finch, Alice Friman, Allison Joseph, Marilyn Kallet, Melissa Kwasny, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Jessica Mehta, Lesléa Newman, Nuala O’Connor, Alicia Suskin Ostriker, Melinda Palacio, Jennifer Perrine, Marge Piercy, Lucinda Roy, Maureen Seaton, Rochelle Spencer, A.E. Stallings, Stacey Waite, Diane Wakoski, Müesser Yeniay, and a fabulous coven of other women’s voices.
 
This event is free and open to the public.
 
 
To be considered for #PoetryNearYou Pick of the Week, we invite you to become a registered user of Poets.org and use our online calendar Poetry Near You to promote local events in your community.
 
 
4:00pm to 6:00pm
Beyond Baroque
681 Venice Blvd
90291 Venice, California
Feb 22 2018

Common Threads 2018 Launch Discusison Group

Join 2018 Common Threads Guest Editor Alan Feldman as he leads the launch of Common Threads with a discussion group hosted at Grub Street. Check out the publication at masspoetry.org/commonthreads.

Register at masspoetry.org/ct2018launch.

5:00pm
Grub Street
162 Boylston Street
02116 Boston, Massachusetts
Feb 22 2018

City Planning Poetics 5: The Queer Ordinary

Organized and hosted by Davy Knittle, "City Planning Poetics" holds events that invite one or more poets and one or more planners, designers, planning historians or others working in the field of city planning to discuss a particular topic central to their work, to ask each other questions, and to read from their current projects.
 
ERICA KAUFMAN is the author of POST CLASSIC (forthcoming from Roof Books), INSTANT CLASSIC (Roof Books, 2013) and censory impulse (Factory School, 2009). she is also the co-editor of NO GENDER: Reflections on the Life and Work of kari edwards (Venn Diagram, 2009), and of Adrienne Rich: Teaching at CUNY, 1968-1974 (Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, 2014). Prose and critical work can be found in: Rain Taxi, The Poetry Project Newsletter, Jacket2, Open Space/SFMOMA Blog, Women's Studies Quarterly, and in The Color of Vowels: New York School Collaborations (ed. Mark Silverberg, Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Additional critical work is forthcoming in the MLA Guide to Teaching Gertrude Stein (eds. L. Esdale and D. Mix) and Reading Experimental Writing (ed. Georgina Colby). kaufman is the Director of the Institute for Writing & Thinking at Bard College, and teaches in the Master of Arts in Teaching Program and in the undergraduate college.
 
JEN JACK GIESEKING is an urban cultural geographer, feminist and queer theorist, environmental psychologist, and American Studies scholar. He is engaged in research on co-productions of space and identity in digital and material environments. Jack’s work pays special attention to how such productions support or inhibit social, spatial, and economic justice in regards to gender and sexuality. He is working on his second book project, A Queer New York: Geographies of Lesbians, Dykes, and Queer Women, 1983-2008, which is under contract with NYU Press and expected to be released in print and online open access in 2019. Jack is also conducting research on trans people’s use of Tumblr as a site of cultural production. He is Assistant Professor of Public Humanities in American Studies at Trinity.
 
6:00pm
Kelly Writers House
3805 Locust Walk
19104 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Feb 22 2018

Book Launch: Bridled by Amy Meng

Join us for the launch of Amy Meng's debut poetry collection, Bridled, winner of Pleiades Press's Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry selected by Jaswinder Bolina. 

WORD Bookstore will kindly supply $5 book vouchers for attendees. Head down the block to Three's Brewing after the launch for a low-key afterparty. 

Order:


Early Praise:

“The power of Amy Meng’s unexpected, exhilarating first book derives from a profound commitment to the work of anatomizing love, to saying what she sees as she looks bravely into the hopes and self-deceptions, the wishes, concessions and complicities that accompany love and marriage. Her taut lines and arresting images, her coupling of the raw and the elegant, serve a vision as energizing as it is unnerving, and Bridled is a terrific debut.”
— Mark Doty

“What does it feel like to be overwhelmed with pleasure and heartbroken all at once? This is the question I found myself staggered by over and again as I read Amy Meng’s masterful book, Bridled. These are poems of such sensual pleasure and such stark devastation. ...These are poems where love is real and symphonic and then entirely gone. How do we recover from that? Amy Meng shows us.”
— Gabrielle Calvocoressi

7:00pm
WORD Brooklyn
126 FRANKLIN ST
11222 BROOKLYN, New York
Feb 22 2018

Airea D. Matthews, Emily Skillings, and Bianca Stone

Airea D. Matthews is the author of the poetry collection Simulacra (Yale University Press, 2017), selected by Carl Phillips as the winner of the 2016 Yale Series of Younger Poets. Matthews received an MFA from the Helen Zell Writers Program at the University of Michigan, where she is currently the assistant director; she also serves as executive editor of The Offing. A Cave Canem Fellow and a Kresge Literary Arts Fellow, Matthews lives in Detroit.

Emily Skillings is the author of the poetry collection Fort Not (The Song Cave, 2017), which Publishers Weekly called a “fabulously eccentric, hypnotic, and hypervigilant debut,” as well as two chapbooks, Backchannel (Poor Claudia) and Linnaeus: The 26 Sexual Practices of Plants (No, Dear/ Small Anchor Press).

Bianca Stone is the author of the poetry collection Someone Else's Wedding Vows, Poetry Comics From the Book of Hours, and contributing artist/collaborator on a special illustrated edition of Anne Carson's Antigonick from New Directions. Bianca co-founded and edits Monk Books, as well as chairs The Ruth Stone Foundation, based in Goshen, VT and Brooklyn, NY.

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7:00pm to 9:00pm
Lillian Vernon Creative Writers House
58 West 10th Street
10003 New York, New York

poems

poem

I’m in a carousel.
The kind that spins
people to the wall.
There is a woman
and a man and a man
inside of it too,
and a man operating it.
Everybody I love is
looking down at me,
laughing. When I die,
I’ll die alone.
I know that much,
held down by my

2
poem
A poem should be palpable and mute
As a globed fruit,

Dumb
As old medallions to the thumb,

Silent as the sleeve-worn stone
Of casement ledges where the moss has grown—

A poem should be wordless
As the flight of birds.

                 *

A poem should be motionless in time 
As the moon climbs,

Leaving, as
poem

My father's silence I cannot brook. By now he must know I live and well.

My heart is nickel, unearthed and sent. We are a manmade catastrophe.

Unable to forgive, deeply mine this earthly light that swells sickly inside.

Like wind I drift westward and profane when the doors of ice slide open.