poem index

poet

Linda Hogan

Printer-friendly version

Linda Hogan received a BA from the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, and an MA from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

She is the author of several poetry collections, including Dark. Sweet.: New & Selected Poems (Coffee House Press, 2014); Rounding the Human Corners (Coffee House Press, 2008); The Book of Medicines (Coffee House Press, 1993), which received the Colorado Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and Seeing Through the Sun (University of Massachusetts Press, 1985).

Of The Book of Medicines, Joy Harjo writes, “Linda Hogan’s poetry has always been a medicine of sorts…. These poems in particular cross over to speak for us in the shining world. They bring back words for healing, the distilled truth of all these stories that are killing us with tears and laughter.”

Hogan is also the author of several works of prose, including The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir (W. W. Norton, 2001). Her first novel, Mean Spirit (Atheneum, 1990), was a finalist for the 1991 Pulitzer Prize.

She currently serves as writer-in-residence for the Chickasaw Nation, and in 2007 she was inducted into the Chickasaw Hall of Fame. Her other honors and awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, the Henry David Thoreau Prize for Nature Writing, a Lannan Literary Award for Poetry, and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas.

Hogan has taught at the Indian Arts Institute and the University of Colorado, where she is a professor emerita. She lives in Colorado.


Selected Bibliography

Poetry
Dark. Sweet.: New & Selected Poems (Coffee House Press, 2014)
Indios: A Poem to Be Spoken (Wings Press, 2011)
Rounding the Human Corners (Coffee House Press, 2008)
The Book of Medicines (Coffee House Press, 1993)
Savings (Coffee House Press, 1988)
Seeing Through the Sun (University of Massachusetts Press, 1985)
Eclipse (American Indian Studies Center, 1983)

Prose
People of the Whale (W. W. Norton, 2008)
The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir (W. W. Norton, 2001)
Power (W. W. Norton, 1998)
Solar Storms (Scribner, 1995)
Dwellings: A Spiritual History of the Living World (W. W. Norton, 1995)
Mean Spirit (Atheneum, 1990)

by this poet

poem

We had been together so very long,
you willing to swim with me
just last month, myself merely small
in the ocean of splendor and light,
the reflections and distortions of us,
and now when I see the man from British Petroleum
lift you up dead from the plastic
bin of death,
he

poem
I am always watching
the single heron at its place
alone at water, its open eye,
one leg lifted 
or wading without seeming to move.

It is a mystery seen
but never touched
until this morning
when I lift it from its side
where it lays breathing.
I know the beak that could attack,
that unwavering golden eye
seeing
poem

This is the word that is always bleeding.
You didn't think this
until your country changes and when it thunders
you search your own body
for a missing hand or leg.
In one country, there are no bodies shown,
lies are told
and they keep hidden the weeping children on dusty streets