poem index

sign up to receive a new poem-a-day in your inbox

About this poet

Chelsea Dingman is the author of Thaw (University of Georgia Press, 2017), which was selected by Allison Joseph as a winner of the National Poetry Series. She teaches at the University of South Florida and lives in Tampa, Florida.

In the Third Trimester, They Can’t Find a Heartbeat

It is the waiting that hurts. The long weeks
            of wanting. Hospice of memory & malice.
I petition the future for more days
            without rain. For days without the cries
of blackbirds overhead. They sense
            death. They know what we do not.
Any minute, the minutes will lengthen
            into a lifetime of forgetting. The oaks lean
into the wind. The river writhes by. The faith-
            less sky breaks itself over us. Once
there was a sacrifice for sin. And it was a bull
            like this one. A first born. I hear the cicadas,
loud in their fury. The dreams of daughters
            that I can’t displace. & I am the pilgrim,
traveling with fever. I am December, cold
            in the ground. I want the daughter to emerge
like a white horse in a clearing. To tell me
            the story of surrender. But she will die
one more time inside me. One more time,
            not a girl, but a dream. An incantation.
A command. Is my body heaven or Eden
            or the opposite of god? Some dreams are meant
to come true. At least, I fear that’s true.
            And what will be left of me as she comes true?
Cheap thrill. Cruelty. The red garment of my body.
            This new absence I’ve been courting
with the purple wounds of the peonies.
            The shadows of last year’s fields.

Originally published in 32 Poems. Copyright © 2017 by Chelsea Dingman. Used with the permission of the author.

Originally published in 32 Poems. Copyright © 2017 by Chelsea Dingman. Used with the permission of the author.

Chelsea Dingman

Chelsea Dingman is the author of Thaw (University of Georgia Press, 2017). She lives in Tampa, Florida.

by this poet

poem

What does it mean to say we know the properties
of ice, of snow? The wheat berries piled in metal bins

in the silos. The house on a corner lot, properly
broken down, the septic tank leaking

into the closets for years, rats in the attic, box
upon box upon box of belongings that belong

poem

                 “This is the only kingdom.
                 The kingdom of touching:
                 the touches of the disappearing, things.”
                                            —Aracelis Girmay

                                                           

poem

A mournful voice sings to quick beats
in my head, but I know nothing of heaven. In a frenzy

of whirling wind, headlights on a white wall, I pull
over the truck. Late April & the sky has broken
its neck. I swear I see faces pass the windshield. The howl

of voices I’ve forgotten in the