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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Sorrows of Werther

  WERTHER had a love for Charlotte
    Such as words could never utter;
  Would you know how first he met her?
    She was cutting bread and butter.

  Charlotte was a married lady,
    And a moral man was Werther,
  And, for all the wealth of Indies,
    Would do nothing for to hurt her.

  So he sighed and pined and ogled,
    And his passion boiled and bubbled,
  Till he blew his silly brains out,
    And no more was by it troubled.

  Charlotte, having seen his body
    Borne before her on a shutter,
  Like a well-conducted person,
    Went on cutting bread and butter.

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

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  They cramm'd their gracious master
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    That never has known the Barber's shear,
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  LINES WRITTEN TO AN ALBUM PRINT.

  As on this pictured page I look,
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  As though it were a novel-book
      Amuses and engages:
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  She is the daughter of the Earl,
  The lad (that has his hair in curl)
      My lord the County's page has