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About this poet

Angela Narciso Torres is the author of Blood Orange (Aquarius Press, 2013), winner of the Willow Books Literature Award for Poetry. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Illinois Arts Council, and the Ragdale Foundation. She is the poetry editor at RHINO and a publicity coordinator for Woman Made Gallery Literary Events. She lives in South Florida.

Prelude and Fugue

Something of late November
   sifting through a window
brings back this prelude—

   two voices blend, I lean
into the keys, draw back
   when the voices part.

How the body remembers—
    Señora V in a floral sundress,
rose talcum hand soft

   on the curve of my spine
imprinting what she knew
   of love and time. How could I know

what those notes would mean
   decades of preludes ahead.

Copyright © 2019 Angela Narciso Torres. This poem was originally published in Quarterly West. Used with permission of the author. 

Copyright © 2019 Angela Narciso Torres. This poem was originally published in Quarterly West. Used with permission of the author. 

Angela Narciso Torres

Angela Narciso Torres is the author of Blood Orange (Aquarius Press, 2013), winner of the Willow Books Literature Award for Poetry. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Illinois Arts Council, and the Ragdale Foundation. She is the poetry editor at RHINO and a publicity coordinator for Woman Made Gallery Literary Events. She lives in South Florida.

by this poet

poem

Suddenly, rain. Our heads
  bowed together like monks
in this hot green place.

   I study the slow script
of her movements. The cross
   and uncross of her legs,

fingers forking together,
   pulling apart. Secret dialect
of her face—a firefly flick

   in the iris,

poem

Carpenter ants picked the T-bone clean.

    The dog’s leash tautened toward
          a square of sun.

A hallway lamp wavered.

     Slice of lit motes through
          the cracked bedroom door.

Her slipper under the bed, another on the armchair.

     On the shell comb, a