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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

My Nora

  Beneath the gold acacia buds
  My gentle Nora sits and broods,
  Far, far away in Boston woods
                  My gentle Nora!

  I see the tear-drop in her e'e,
  Her bosom's heaving tenderly;
  I know—I know she thinks of me,
                  My Darling Nora!

  And where am I?  My love, whilst thou
  Sitt'st sad beneath the acacia bough,
  Where pearl's on neck, and wreath on brow,
                  I stand, my Nora!

  Mid carcanet and coronet,
  Where joy-lamps shine and flowers are set—
  Where England's chivalry are met,
                  Behold me, Nora!

  In this strange scene of revelry,
  Amidst this gorgeous chivalry,
  A form I saw was like to thee,
                  My love—my Nora!

  She paused amidst her converse glad;
  The lady saw that I was sad,
  She pitied the poor lonely lad,—
                  Dost love her, Nora?

  In sooth, she is a lovely dame,
  A lip of red, and eye of flame,
  And clustering golden locks, the same
                  As thine, dear Nora?

  Her glance is softer than the dawn's,
  Her foot is lighter than the fawn's,
  Her breast is whiter than the swan's,
                  Or thine, my Nora!

  Oh, gentle breast to pity me!
  Oh, lovely Ladye Emily!
  Till death—till death I'll think of thee—
                  Of thee and Nora!

This poem is in the public domain.

This poem is in the public domain.

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

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