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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Larry O'Toole

  You've all heard of Larry O'Toole,
  Of the beautiful town of Drumgoole;
    He had but one eye,
    To ogle ye by—
  Oh, murther, but that was a jew'l!
    A fool
  He made of de girls, dis O'Toole.

  'Twas he was the boy didn't fail,
  That tuck down pataties and mail;
    He never would shrink
    From any sthrong dthrink,
  Was it whisky or Drogheda ale;
    I'm bail
  This Larry would swallow a pail.

  Oh, many a night at the bowl,
  With Larry I've sot cheek by jowl;
    He's gone to his rest,
    Where's there's dthrink of the best,
  And so let us give his old sowl
    A howl,
  For 'twas he made the noggin to rowl.

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

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  When the bold