About this poet

Rafael Campo was born in Dover, New Jersey, on November 24, 1964. He attended both Amherst College and Harvard Medical School before publishing his first collection of poems, The Other Man Was Me: A Voyage to the New World, which won the National Poetry Series Open Competition in 1993.

Since then, he has published several books, including Comfort Measures Only: New and Selected Poems, 1994-2016 (Duke University Press, 2018); The Enemy, (Duke University Press, 2007); Landscape with Human Figure (Duke University Press, 2002); Diva (1999), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and What the Body Told (1996), winner of a Lambda Literary Award. He is also the author of two prose collections, including The Healing Art: A Doctor's Black Bag of Poetry (W. W. Norton & Company, 2003) and The Poetry of Healing (W. W. Norton, 1996), which also received a Lambda Literary Award for Memoir.

About Campo's work, the poet Mark Doty has said, "Rafael Campo's rhymes and iambs construct their music against the edgy, recognizble world his poems inhabit: the landscape of birth and of dying, sorrow and sex, shame and brave human persistence—first and last things, center stage in these large-hearted, open, deeply felt poems."

Campo is a PEN Center West Literary Award finalist and a recipient of the National Hispanic Academy of Arts and Sciences Annual Achievement Award. He recently received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Echoing Green Foundation.

He is a practicing physician at Harvard Medical School and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.


Selected Bibliography

Poetry
Comfort Measures Only: New and Selected Poems, 1994-2016 (Duke University Press, 2018) 
The Enemy, (Duke University Press, 2007)
Landscape with Human Figure (Duke University Press, 2002) 
Diva (1999)
What the Body Told (1996)

Prose
The Healing Art: A Doctor's Black Bag of Poetry (W. W. Norton & Company, 2003)
The Poetry of Healing (W. W. Norton, 1996)

Health

While jogging on the treadmill at the gym,
that exercise in getting nowhere fast,
I realized we need a health pandemic.
Obesity writ large no more, Alzheimer's
forgotten, we could live carefree again.
We'd chant the painted shaman's sweaty oaths,
We'd kiss the awful relics of the saints,
we'd sip the bitter tea from twisted roots,
we'd listen to our grandmothers' advice.
We'd understand the moonlight's whispering.
We'd exercise by making love outside, 
and afterwards, while thinking only of
how much we'd lived in just one moment's time,
forgive ourselves for wanting something more:
to praise the memory of long-lost need,
or not to live forever in a world 
made painless by our incurable joy.

Copyright © 2010 by Rafael Campo. Used with permission of the author.

Copyright © 2010 by Rafael Campo. Used with permission of the author.