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About this poet

Born on July 23, 1959 in Everett, Washington, Carl Phillips is the author of numerous books of poetry, including Wild Is the Wind, forthcoming from Farrar, Straus and Giroux in January 2018; Reconnaisance (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015), Silverchest (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013), Double Shadow (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012), Quiver of Arrows: Selected Poems 1986-2006 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007) and Riding Westward (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006). His collection The Rest of Love (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004) won the Theodore Roethke Memorial Foundation Poetry Prize and the Thom Gunn Award for Gay Male Poetry, and was a finalist for the National Book Award.

His other books include Rock Harbor (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2002); The Tether (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001), winner of the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award; Pastoral (Graywolf Press, 2000), winner of the Lambda Literary Award; From the Devotions (Graywolf Press, 1998), finalist for the National Book Award; Cortége (Graywolf Press, 1995), finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and In the Blood (Northeastern University Press, 1992), winner of the Samuel French Morse Poetry Prize.

His work has been anthologized in The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry (Vintage Books, 2003), edited by J. D. McClatchy; Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Introduction and Anthology (St. Martin's Press, 2002), edited by Helen Vendler; Gay and Lesbian Poetry in Our Time (St. Martin's Press, 1988); Contemporary American Poetry (Houghton Mifflin, 2001); and The Vintage Book of African American Poetry (Vintage Books, 2000). His poems have also been chosen eight times for the annual Best American Poetry series. Phillips is also the author of a book of prose, Coin of the Realm: Essays on the Art and Life of Poetry (Graywolf Press, 2004), and the translator of Sophocles’s Philoctetes (Oxford University Press, 2003).

His honors include the 2006 Academy of American Poets Fellowship, an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Pushcart Prize, the Academy of American Poets Prize, induction into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Library of Congress.

Ancient Greek and Roman writers, especially Thucydides, Cicero, and Tacitus, were an early influence for Phillips. He studied their work extensively in college, and through them learned "how forceful syntax can be in conveying nuance" as well as the use of "compression when conveying psychological and emotional crisis." Later, while studying with Geoffrey Hill, he discovered English Metaphysical poets such as George Herbert and John Donne.

According to the Judges' Citation for the 1998 National Book Awards, "Carl Phillips's passionate and lyrical poems read like prayers, with a prayer's hesitations, its desire to be utterly accurate, its occasional flowing outbursts."

Phillips served as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 2006 to 2012. He is Professor of English and of African and African American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, where he also teaches in the creative writing program. 


Selected Bibliography

Wild Is the Wind (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018)
Reconnaisance (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015)
Silverchest (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013)
Double Shadow (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012)
Quiver of Arrows: Selected Poems 1986-2006 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007)
Riding Westward (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006)
The Rest of Love (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004)
Rock Harbor (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2002)
The Tether (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001)
Pastoral (Graywolf Press, 2000)
From the Devotions (Graywolf Press, 1998)
Cortége (Graywolf Press, 1995)
In the Blood (Northeastern University Press, 1992)

Gold Leaf

To lift, without ever asking what animal exactly it once belonged to,
the socketed helmet that what’s left of the skull equals
up to your face, to hold it there, mask-like, to look through it until
looking through means looking back, back through the skull,
into the self that is partly the animal you’ve always wanted to be,
that—depending—fear has prevented or rescued you from becoming,
to know utterly what you’ll never be, to understand in doing so
what you are, and say no to it, not to who you are, to say no to despair.

From Wild Is the Wind by Carl Phillips. Copyright © 2018 by Carl Phillips. Reprinted with the permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

From Wild Is the Wind by Carl Phillips. Copyright © 2018 by Carl Phillips. Reprinted with the permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Carl Phillips

Carl Phillips

Born on July 23, 1959, Carl Phillips's collection The Rest of Love won the Theodore Roethke Memorial Foundation Poetry Prize and the Thom Gunn Award for Gay Male Poetry.

by this poet

poem
So that each
is its own, now—each has fallen, blond stillness.
Closer, above them,
the damselflies pass as they would over water, 
if the fruit were water,
or as bees would, if they weren't
somewhere else, had the fruit found
already a point more steep
in rot, as soon it must, if
none shall lift it from the
poem
          They’d only done what all along they’d come
intending to do. So they lay untouched by regret,
after. The combined light and shadow of passing
cars stutter-shifted across the walls the way,
in summer,
                the night moths used to, softly
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poem

 

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