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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

The Ghazul, or Oriental Love-Song

  THE ROCKS.

I was a timid little antelope;
  My home was in the rocks, the lonely rocks.

  I saw the hunters scouring on the plain;
  I lived among the rocks, the lonely rocks.

  I was a-thirsty in the summer-heat;
  I ventured to the tents beneath the rocks.

  Zuleikah brought me water from the well;
  Since then I have been faithless to the rocks.

  I saw her face reflected in the well;
  Her camels since have marched into the rocks.

  I look to see her image in the well;
  I only see my eyes, my own sad eyes.
  My mother is alone among the rocks.

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

by this poet

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  BY ADELBERT VON CHAMISSO.

 "—'s war Einer, dem's zu Herzen gieng."

  There lived a sage in days of yore
  And he a handsome pigtail wore;
  But wondered much and sorrowed more
       Because it hung behind him.

  He mused upon this curious case,
  And swore he'd change the pigtail's place,
  And have it
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  FROM UHLAND.

  "Da liegen sie alle, die grauen Höhen."

  The cold gray hills they bind me around,
    The darksome valleys lie sleeping below,
  But the winds as they pass o'er all this ground,
    Bring me never a sound of woe!

  Oh! for all I have suffered and striven,
    Care has embittered my cup and
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  Know ye the willow-tree
    Whose gray leaves quiver,
  Whispering gloomily
    To yon pale river;
  Lady, at even-tide
    Wander not near it,
  They say its branches hide
    A sad, lost spirit?

  Once to the willow-tree
    A maid came fearful,
  Pale seemed her cheek to be,
    Her blue eye tearful;