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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

THE GHAZUL, OR ORIENTAL LOVE-SONG.

  THE ROCKS.

I was a timid little antelope;
  My home was in the rocks, the lonely rocks.

  I saw the hunters scouring on the plain;
  I lived among the rocks, the lonely rocks.

  I was a-thirsty in the summer-heat;
  I ventured to the tents beneath the rocks.

  Zuleikah brought me water from the well;
  Since then I have been faithless to the rocks.

  I saw her face reflected in the well;
  Her camels since have marched into the rocks.

  I look to see her image in the well;
  I only see my eyes, my own sad eyes.
  My mother is alone among the rocks.

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

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  LA MOTTE FOUQUÉ.

 "Und Du gingst einst, die Myrt' im Haare."

  And thou wert once a maiden fair,
    A blushing virgin warm and young:
  With myrtles wreathed in golden hair,
  And glossy brow that knew no care—
    Upon a bridegroom's arm you hung.

  The golden locks are silvered now,
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Christmas is here;
Winds whistle shrill,
Icy and chill,
Little care we;
Little we fear
Weather without,
Shelter'd about
The Mahogany Tree.

Once on the boughs
Birds of rare plume
Sang, in its bloom;
Night birds are we;
Here we carouse,
Singing,

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      Come to the greenwood tree,
      Come where the dark woods be,
      Dearest, O come with me!
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

      Come—'tis the moonlight hour,
      Dew is on leaf and flower,
      Come to the linden bower,—
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!