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About this poet

T. E. Hulme was born on September 16, 1883, in Endon, England. He attended St. John’s College, Cambridge, but left without taking a degree. In 1912, the literary magazine New Age featured five of his poems, which were then reprinted in Pound’s poetry collection Ripostes (Swift & Co., 1912). Although he published very few poems during his lifetime, he was one of the founders of the imagist movement and an important figure in twentieth century poetry. T. S. Eliot writes, “Hulme is classical, reactionary, and revolutionary; he is the antipodes of the eclectic, tolerant, and democratic mind of the end of the last century.” Hulme was killed in action during World War I on September 28, 1917. 

The Embankment

(The fantasia of a fallen gentleman on a cold, bitter night.)

Once, in finesse of fiddles found I ecstasy,
In the flash of gold heels on the hard pavement.
Now see I
That warmth’s the very stuff of poesy.
Oh, God, make small
The old star-eaten blanket of the sky,
That I may fold it round me and in comfort lie.

This poem is in the public domain.

This poem is in the public domain.

T. E. Hulme

T. E. Hulme

T. E. Hulme, one of the founders of the imagist movement, was born on September 16, 1883, in Endon, England. 

by this poet

poem

Beauty is the marking-time, the stationary vibration, the feigned ecstasy of an arrested impulse unable to reach its natural end.

Mana Aboda, whose bent form
The sky in archèd circle is,
Seems ever for an unknown grief to mourn.
Yet on a day I heard her cry:
'I weary of the roses and the

poem
A touch of cold in the Autumn night
I walked abroad,
And saw the ruddy moon lean over a hedge
Like a red-faced farmer.
I did not stop to speak, but nodded; 
And round about were the wistful stars
With white faces like town children.
poem

Above the quiet dock in mid night,
Tangled in the tall mast’s corded height,
Hangs the moon. What seemed so far away
Is but a child’s balloon, forgotten after play.