poem index

sign up to receive a new poem-a-day in your inbox

About this poet

The authorship of the following poems is unknown.

Eadwacer

To my people it's as though he gave them a sacrifice:
They will destroy him if he comes among them.
   It is otherwise with us.

Wulf is on one island, I on another.
A fastness is that island, rung round with fens.
Fierce men are there on the island.
They will destroy him if he comes among them.
   It is otherwise with us.

I thought of my Wulf's far wanderings
when it was rainy weather and I sat weeping
when the war-chief caught me in his arms—
it was joy then, yet it was also hateful.

Wulf, my Wulf! Waiting for you
has made me ill, your seldom coming,
this sorrowing mood—not lack of meat.

Do you hear, Eadwacer? Our poor whelp
a wolf bears off to the wood.

How easy for man to break what never was bound—
   our song together.

from The Women Poets in English, edited by Ann Stanford

from The Women Poets in English, edited by Ann Stanford

Anonymous

The authorship of this poem is unknown.

by this poet

poem
There was a lady loved a swine,
     "Honey!" quoth she;
"Pig-hog, wilt thou be mine?"
     "Hoogh!" quoth he.

"I'll build thee a silver sty,
     Honey!" quoth she;
"And in it thou shalt lie!"
     "Hoogh!" quoth he.

"Pinned with a silver pin,
     Honey!" quoth she;
"That thou mayest go out and in,"
     "
2
poem
I

'The wind doth blow today, my love,  
  And a few small drops of rain;  
I never had but one true-love;  
  In cold grave she was lain.  
  
II

'I'll do as much for my true-love 
  As any young man may;  
I'll sit and mourn all at her grave  
  For a twelvemonth and a day.'  
  
III

The twelvemonth and a
poem
The man cut his throat and left his head there.
The others went to get it.
When they got there they put the head in a sack.
Farther on the head fell out onto the ground.
They put the head back in the sack.
Farther on the head fell out again.
Around the first sack they put a second one that 
   was thicker.
But