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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Come to the Greenwood Tree

      Come to the greenwood tree,
      Come where the dark woods be,
      Dearest, O come with me!
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

      Come—'tis the moonlight hour,
      Dew is on leaf and flower,
      Come to the linden bower,—
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

  Dark is the wood, and wide
  Dangers, they say, betide;
  But, at my Albert's side,
  Nought I fear, O my love—O my love!

  Welcome the greenwood tree,
  Welcome the forest free,
  Dearest, with thee, with thee,
  Nought I fear, O my love—O my love!

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

by this poet

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  You've all heard of Larry O'Toole,
  Of the beautiful town of Drumgoole;
    He had but one eye,
    To ogle ye by—
  Oh, murther, but that was a jew'l!
    A fool
  He made of de girls, dis O'Toole.

  'Twas he was the boy didn't fail,
  That tuck down pataties and mail;
    He never would shrink
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  LINES WRITTEN TO AN ALBUM PRINT.

  As on this pictured page I look,
  This pretty tale of line and hook
  As though it were a novel-book
      Amuses and engages:
  I know them both, the boy and girl;
  She is the daughter of the Earl,
  The lad (that has his hair in curl)
      My lord the County's page has
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    With ganial foire
    Thransfuse me loyre,
  Ye sacred nympths of Pindus,
    The whoile I sing
    That wondthrous thing,
  The Palace made o' windows!

    Say, Paxton, truth,
    Thou wondthrous youth,
  What sthroke of art celistial,
    What power was lint
    You to invint
  This combineetion cristial