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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Come to the Greenwood Tree

      Come to the greenwood tree,
      Come where the dark woods be,
      Dearest, O come with me!
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

      Come—'tis the moonlight hour,
      Dew is on leaf and flower,
      Come to the linden bower,—
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

  Dark is the wood, and wide
  Dangers, they say, betide;
  But, at my Albert's side,
  Nought I fear, O my love—O my love!

  Welcome the greenwood tree,
  Welcome the forest free,
  Dearest, with thee, with thee,
  Nought I fear, O my love—O my love!

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

by this poet

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  LINES WRITTEN TO AN ALBUM PRINT.

  As on this pictured page I look,
  This pretty tale of line and hook
  As though it were a novel-book
      Amuses and engages:
  I know them both, the boy and girl;
  She is the daughter of the Earl,
  The lad (that has his hair in curl)
      My lord the County's page has
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  There's in the Vest a city pleasant
    To vich King Bladud gev his name,
  And in that city there's a Crescent
    Vere dwelt a noble knight of fame.

  Although that galliant knight is oldish,
    Although Sir John as gray, gray air,
  Hage has not made his busum coldish,
    His Art still beats tewodds the
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  Ye pathrons of janius, Minerva and Vanius,
    Who sit on Parnassus, that mountain of snow,
  Descind from your station and make observation
    Of the Prince's pavilion in sweet Pimlico.

  This garden, by jakurs, is forty poor acres,
    (The garner he tould me, and sure ought to know;)
  And yet greatly