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About this Poem 

From Ballads and Songs (London: Cassell and Company, 1896).

 

Ad Ministram

  Dear LUCY, you know what my wish is,—
    I hate all your Frenchified fuss:
  Your silly entres and made dishes
    Were never intended for us.
  No footman in lace and in ruffles
    Need dangle behind my arm-chair;
  And never mind seeking for truffles,
    Although they be ever so rare.

  But a plain leg of mutton, my Lucy,
    I prithee get ready at three:
  Have it smoking, and tender and juicy,
    And what better meat can there be?
  And when it has feasted the master,
    'Twill amply suffice for the maid;
  Meanwhile I will smoke my canaster,
    And tipple my ale in the shade.

This poem is in the public domain. 

This poem is in the public domain. 

William Makepeace Thackeray

William Makepeace Thackeray, born July 18, 1811, was an English writer best known for his novels, particularly The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. (The Mershon Company Publishers, 1852) and Vanity Fair (Bradbury and Evans, 1848). While in school, Thackeray began writing poems, which he published in a number of magazines, chiefly Fraser and Punch. He died on December 24, 1863.

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  The rose upon my balcony the morning air perfuming,
  Was leafless all the winter time and pining for the spring;
  You ask me why her breath is sweet, and why her cheek is blooming,
  It is because the sun is out and birds begin to sing.

  The nightingale, whose melody is through the greenwood ringing,
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  Came a Cockney bound
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  Weary was his soul,
    Shivering and sad, he
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    Leads to Limavaddy.

  Mountains stretch'd around,
    Gloomy was their tinting,
  And the horse's hoofs
    Made a dismal clinting;
  Wind
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      Come to the greenwood tree,
      Come where the dark woods be,
      Dearest, O come with me!
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!

      Come—'tis the moonlight hour,
      Dew is on leaf and flower,
      Come to the linden bower,—
  Let us rove—O my love—O my love!