About this poet

In 1956, Forrest Gander was born in Barstow, California. He attended the College of William and Mary and received an MA from San Francisco State University. He holds degrees in both geology and literature.

Gander is the author of several collections of poetry, including Eye Against Eye (New Directions Press, 2005); Torn Awake (2001); Science & Steepleflower (1998); Deeds of Utmost Kindness (1994); Lynchburg (1993); and Rush to the Lake (1988).

He is the editor of Mouth to Mouth: 12 Contemporary Mexican Women Poets (1993), a bilingual anthology of contemporary Mexican poets, and the translator of No Shelter: The Selected Poems of Pura López Colomé. He also co-translated Immanent Visitor: The Selected Poems of Jaime Saenz with Kent Johnson.

Gander edits Lost Roads Publishers with poet C. D. Wright. His collection of essays, A Faithful Existence, was published in 2005.

"Forrest Gander is a Southern poet of a relatively rare kind, a restlessly experimental writer," wrote poet Robert Hass.

Gander's honors include a Whiting Award, two Gertrude Stein Awards for Innovative North American Writing, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and Yaddo.

Gander is professor of English and comparative literature at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

The Thousand Somethings of Someone

Forrest Gander
Could have been
otherwise and 
birdsong make us 
nauseous. And
gigantic roiling sunsets
give us vertigo. The
world of flowers is
for insects, not 
us. But tonic
is durance among.

Copyright © 2012 by Forrest Gander. Used with permission of the author.

Forrest Gander

Forrest Gander

Forest Gander is the author of several poetry collections, including Eye Against Eye (New Directions Press, 2005).

by this poet

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As if nothing were wrong egrets dip-feed in near shore channels

the human genome reveals chromosomes from parasites

annexed by our DNA long ago

mongrels to the core and tourists

with cameras take the front pews

the enemy blows himself up at Passover dinner

the enemy trembles in a

poem
                      for C


                                               Through my torso, the smooth
		
                           diffusion of aguas ardientes.  Another
	
            shot.  Dawn.  

				
                                               Fan whir covers distant