poem index

Letter Spoken in Wind

Rachel Galvin
Today we walked the inlet Nybøl Nor
     remembering how to tread on frozen snow.
          Ate cold sloeberries

that tasted of wind—a white pucker—
     spat their sour pits in snow. Along
          the horizon, a line of windmills dissolved

into a white field. Your voice
     on the phone, a gesund auf dein keppele
          you blessed my head. Six months now

since I've seen you. There are
     traces of you here, your curls still dark
          and long, your woven dove,

the room you stayed in: send your syllables,
     I am swimming below the tidemark.
          Words shed overcoats, come

to me undressed, slender-limbed, they have no
     letters yet. It is the festival
          of lights, I have no

candles. I light one for each night,
     pray on a row
          of nine lighthouses.

From Pulleys & Locomotion (Black Lawrence Press, 2009). Copyright © 2009 by Rachel Galvin. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.

Rachel Galvin

Rachel Galvin

by this poet

poem
I trail my suitcase along the platform,
the weight of the air’s mechanism
at the small of my back. In the old country 

a man would arrive from afar, 
give each child a whistle, and parade them 
through the village, whistling.

What is this fury of forms, boarding trains, 
handing out whistles to children? 
Dear