About this poet

Kim Addonizio was born in Washington, D.C., on July 31, 1954. She received her BA and MA from San Francisco State University.

Her books of poetry include Lucifer at the Starlite (W. W. Norton, 2009); What Is This Thing Called Love: Poems (W. W. Norton, 2004); Tell Me (BOA Editions, 2000), which was a finalist for the National Book Award; Jimmy & Rita (BOA Editions, 1997); The Philosopher's Club (BOA Editions, 1994); and Three West Coast Women, with Laurie Duesing and Dorianne Laux (Five Fingers Press, 1987).

Addonizio is also the author of In the Box Called Pleasure (Fiction Collective 2, 1999), a collection of stories, and, with Dorianne Laux, the co-author of The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry (W.W. Norton, 1997). She coedited Dorothy Parker's Elbow: Tattoos on Writers, Writers on Tattoos (Grand Central Publishing, 2002) with Cheryl Dumesnil. Addonizio was a founding editor of the journal Five Fingers Review.

Among her awards and honors are fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, a Pushcart Prize, and a Commonwealth Club Poetry Medal. Kim Addonizio teaches in the MFA program at Goddard College and lives in San Francisco.




Selected Bibliography

Poetry

Lucifer at the Starlite: Poems (W.W. Norton, 2009)
What Is This Thing Called Love: Poems (W.W. Norton, 2005)
Tell Me (BOA Editions, 2000)
Jimmy & Rita (BOA Editions, 1997)
The Philosophers Club (BOA Editions, 1994)
Three West Coast Women (with Laurie Duesing and Dorianne Laux) (Five Fingers Press, 1987)

Prose

Ordinary Genius: A Guide for the Poet Within (W.W. Norton, 2009)
My Dreams Out in the Street (Simon & Schuster, 2007)
Little Beauties (Simon & Schuster, 2006)
In the Box Called Pleasure (Fiction Collective 2, 1999)
The Poet’s Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry (W.W. Norton, 1997)

Half-Hearted Sonnet

Kim Addonizio, 1954
He'd left his belt. She
followed him and
threw it in the street.
Wine: kisses: snake: end

of their story. Be-
gin again, under-
stand what happened; de-
spite that battered

feeling, it will have been
worth it; better to
have etc…
(—not to have been born

at all— Schopenhauer.)
But, soft! Enter tears.

Copyright © 2012 by Kim Addonizio. Used with permission of the author.

Copyright © 2012 by Kim Addonizio. Used with permission of the author.

Kim Addonizio

Kim Addonizio

Kim Addonizio's poetry collections include Lucifer at the Starlite (W. W. Norton, 2009); What Is This Thing Called Love: Poems (W. W. Norton, 2004); and Tell Me (BOA Editions, 2000), which was a finalist for the National Book Award.

by this poet

poem
That Mississippi chicken shack.
That initial-scarred tabletop,
that tiny little dance floor to the left of the band.
That kiosk at the mall selling caramels and kitsch.
That tollbooth with its white-plastic-gloved worker
handing you your change.
That phone booth with the receiver ripped out.
That dressing room
poem
In this shallow creek
they flop and writhe forward as the dead 
float back toward them. Oh, I know

what I should say: fierce burning in the body 
as her eggs burst free, milky cloud 
of sperm as he quickens them. I should stand

on the bridge with my camera, 
frame the white froth of rapids where one 
arcs up
poem

I think I detect cracked leather.
I’m pretty sure I smell the cherries
from a Shirley Temple my father bought me

in 1959, in a bar in Orlando, Florida,
and the chlorine from my mother’s bathing cap.
And last winter’s kisses, like salt on black ice,

like the moon slung away