The First Olympic Ode [excerpt]

Pindar

Translated by Gilbert West
 

Chief is water of the elements; gold too, amid ennobling wealth, shines eminent, like fire, flaming in the night: but my soul, if thou desire to blazon combats, seek not, during day, any brilliant star, wheeling through the desert air, more radiant than the sun: neither any list, more excellent than Olympia's, (whence, to resound Saturn's son, proceeds the song of fame, framed by the poets' skill) can we speak, coming to the wealthy, happy mansion of Hiero.

 

Further Reading

Poems About Sports
A Boy Juggling a Soccer Ball
by Christopher Merrill
After Skate
by Carol Muske-Dukes
Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio
by James Wright
Baseball and Writing
by Marianne Moore
Casey at the Bat
by Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Days of Me
by Stuart Dischell
Fishing on the Susquehanna in July
by Billy Collins
Night Baseball
by Michael Blumenthal
Séance at Tennis
by Dana Goodyear
Tackle Football
by Dan Chiasson
The Bee
by James Dickey
The Trouble Ball [excerpt]
by Martín Espada
To An Athlete Dying Young
by A. E. Housman
Train-Mates
by Witter Bynner